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Tomb of Emperor Jing Di (Hanyangling)
Tomb of Emperor Jing Di (Hanyangling)

Tomb of Emperor Jing Di (Hanyangling)

Zhanjiawan Village, Xian, China

The Basics

The Tomb of Emperor Jing Di, also called the Hanyangling or Han Yangling Mausoleum, ranks as one of Xian’s most underrated attractions; since it’s not inundated with travelers like its more popular counterpart, those who take the time to visit will find plenty of room to appreciate the impressive site. An underground exhibition hall with glass floors gives visitors the chance to watch museum staff working on the excavation in real time. Some multi-day tours of Xian include a visit to the tomb, though it’s also possible to arrange a private day tour to both the Jingdi tomb and the Terracotta Warriors for a more complete picture of Xian’s historical significance.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The Tomb of Emperor Jing Di is a must for history buffs and those looking for a quiet alternative to the Terracotta Warriors.

  • Public restrooms are available in the parking lot and near the museum exit.

  • Visit the museum with a local guide to learn more about the history and significance of what you’re seeing.

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How to Get There

If you’re visiting the Hanyangling tomb site independently, the easiest way to get there is by taking the Xian Metro line 2 to Shitushuguan station and leave through exit D. From there, bus 4 takes visitors to the archeological site. It’s also an easy stop-off by taxi between the airport and Xian.

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Trip ideas

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When to Get There

Save for Chinese national holidays, this archaeological site rarely gets crowded. It’s open daily throughout the year, though entrance is slightly cheaper during the off-season (December to February).

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Who Was Emperor Jingdi?

The Han dynasty Emperor Jingdi, who ruled during the second century BC, was incredibly popular. A Taoist practitioner, he based his governing on the idea of noninterference by lowering taxes, cutting unnecessary military expenditures, and reforming the criminal penal system.

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