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Akasaka Palace (State Guest House) Tours

Akasaka Palace (State Guest House)
Akasaka Palace—the only neobaroque building in Japan—was built in 1909 as the residence of the Crown Prince of Japan, but in 1975 was turned into the State Guest House. As a result, many very important international guests have stayed here and continue to do so. The central Tokyo palace is open to visitors when dignitaries aren’t in town.

The Basics
Akasaka Palace, a National Treasure of Japan, was built on the site of a large Edo-era (1603-1868) estate belonging to the Tokugawa clan. It is one of Japan’s largest and best remaining examples of a Meiji-era (1868-1912) building. A surprising bit of European aesthetic in Japan, the building and grounds are popular with locals and visitors alike. 

The palace is often visited on sightseeing tours of the surrounding Akasaka area as well as some themed tours that focus on Japanese history and architecture. Independent visitors wanting to see the building can book tickets online for a specific time slot; you pay upon arrival. The grounds are free to explore and require no advance booking.

Things to Know Before You Go
  • Akasaka Palace is ideal for architecture and design enthusiasts.
  • While you may be able to get a ticket at the door, people with online reservations get priority during busy times.
  • There are different entrance fees to view the exterior only or the interior. Audio guides cost extra.
  • Photography inside the palace is not permitted.
  • Security lines at the building entrance can be long, so don’t bring large bags.
  • There are elevators and accessible restrooms, but the front and back garden areas are covered in stone and gravel, so are not so easy to navigate in a wheelchair.

How to Get There
The palace is located in the Akasaka area of central Tokyo, not far from Meiji Jingu, Shinjuku Park, and Roppongi. The closest train station is Yotsuya, on the JR Chuo Line. As with elsewhere in Tokyo, it’s advisable to take the train rather than a car or taxi.

When to Get There
The palace is open from 10am to 5pm Thursday through Tuesday except when foreign dignitaries are staying there. Visits—even prebooked ones—may be canceled at short notice if a dignitary is visiting.

Visit the Tokyo Imperial Palace
Royal watchers may want to combine a visit to the Akasaka Palace with the Tokyo Imperial Palace, whose inner grounds are open to the public only twice a year: on December 23 (Emperor’s Birthday) and January 2, when the Imperial Family makes appearances on their balcony. On the other 363 days of the year, you can get a guided tour of the palace grounds with prior booking, or free access to the East Gardens.
Address: 2-1-1 Motoakasaka, Minato, Tokyo 107-0051, Japan
Admission: Varies
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4 Tours and Activities to Experience Akasaka Palace (State Guest House)

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Historical Journey including Akasaka Palace Admission Ticket

Historical Journey including Akasaka Palace Admission Ticket

star-5
Tokyo is one of the world’s 10 biggest cities. It can be hard to decide what to see and do. Let a professional guide take you on a tour of Akasaka, and learn the history of the city from a local. Go back in time to the Edo period. See where the samurai used to reside, visit shrines and shopping streets, view embassies and guest houses. Watch artisans at work at Aoyama Square, and finish your tour with lunch at a restaurant symbolizing Akasaka.
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  • 4 hours
  • Free Cancellation
  • Taking safety measures
From
$106.52
Price varies by group size
From
$106.52
Price varies by group size
Taking safety measures

Private Tour - Visit Japanese Gardens and Shrines in the Heart of the City

Private Tour - Visit Japanese Gardens and Shrines in the Heart of the City

star-5
Explore the history and culture of Tokyo’s Akasaka district on this guided excursion. Escape Tokyo’s skyscrapers and discover an area where the Edo period comes to life with a 400-year-old garden, the Inari Shrine, Shimizudani Park, and other sites. Enjoy a relaxing stroll, sip a cup of tea beside a pond, and learn about the Edo Shogunate from an informative local guide.
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  • 3 to 4 hours
  • Free Cancellation
  • Taking safety measures
From
$97.75
From
$97.75
Taking safety measures

Chara-ben (Character Lunch Box) Making

Chara-ben (Character Lunch Box) Making

star-5
Japanese "Bento" is popular as "BENTO" overseas. "Chara-ben", a kind of bento which shapes rice and side dishes into manga and anime characters, is a unique culture of animation advanced country Japan, attracting attitudes all over the world In this plan, we gonna introduce you how to make a Chara-ben into popular characters among foreigners such as Kumamon and Totoro in English. This will be an experience of making a very cute chara-ben decorated with seaweed and cheese easily. It will be too cute to be ate. It is a new attempt to let foreigners get connections with Japanese culture through Japanese-style food.
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  • 2 hours 30 minutes
  • Free Cancellation
  • Taking safety measures
From
$85.22
From
$85.22
Taking safety measures

Highlights of Tokyo Day Trip for Standard Interests

Highlights of Tokyo Day Trip for Standard Interests

Learn about the Edo period of Tokyo's history with this private, customizable tour. Your tour will start with a visit to the Edo-Tokyo Museum to learn about what Tokyo was like when it was still called Edo. You'll then head to Asakusa to visit the Senso-ju Temple, followed by some shopping at the Nakamise Shopping Street and a visit to Hama Rikyu Gardens.
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  • 8 hours
  • Free Cancellation
From
$276.10
per group
From
$276.10
per group

Frequently Asked Questions

The answers provided below are based on answers previously given by the tour provider to customers’ questions.
Q:
What's the best way to experience Akasaka Palace (State Guest House)?