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Things to Do in Texas

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Hermann Park
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One of Houston’s most popular public greens, the free-to-enjoy Hermann Park is a historic 445-acre park that is home to many important cultural institutions as well as outdoor attractions. For those wanting to experience the city’s natural beauty, head to Bob’s Fishing Pier for some fishing, go hiking in the 80 acres of Bayou Parkland, peruse 2,500 rose bushes and outdoor sculptures at the Garden Center, pedal boat on the 8-acre McGovern Lake or play a round at the 18-hole Hermann Park Golf Course, the first desegregated golf course in the United States. For a serene experience, the Japanese Garden provides a peaceful retreat with waterfalls, wooden bridges, stone pathways, sweet cherry trees, Japanese maples and colorful flowers, while the Mary Gibbs and Jesse J. Jones Reflection Pool measures 740 feet long by 80 feet wide and features a black bottom for striking mirror images of the surrounding trees.

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Downtown Tunnels
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The signature weather of Houston is something to write home about – it’s hot. Really hot in the summer, and as Houston is a do-something city, the powers that be decided to do something about it – they built the Houston Downtown Tunnels. A series of interconnected and, bless them, air-conditioned tunnels running 20 feet below the surface of the street, the Downtown Tunnels connect restaurants, shops and office buildings and provide some much-needed respite from the Houston heat. A feat of engineering that connects 95 city blocks, the tunnels themselves are an attraction for the Houston visitor.  While you might expect a city of two million people to offer a downtown scene full of bustling people, you may find Houston’s streets oddly deserted – but that’s just because the real life of the downtown scene is happening underground. See it for yourself, and enjoy one of the most unique attractions in the entire southwest.

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Natural Bridge Caverns
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Full of exploration opportunities and endless adventure, the Natural Bridge Caverns were discovered near San Antonio in 1960 by some university students, one of whom then went on to assist the landowners with how to proceed with development. During excavations, artifacts dating back to 5,000 DC were unearthed at the entrance trail. These included a jawbone and femur from an extinct species of black bear. Even so, the caverns are still being explored, and it’s believed more passages exist.

Visitors to Natural Bridge Caverns can partake in a number of activities. One of the most popular is a 75-minute walking tour that takes you 180 feet (55 meters) underground to discover the hallways and various speleothems, or stalagmites, which are formed by mineral deposits. Other above-ground options include ziplines, a canopy explorer course and the opportunity to mine for gems, minerals or fossils.

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Houston City Hall
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A prime example of southwestern architecture of the late 1930s, Houston’s City Hall was built to house the local government and state officials who do business within the city of Houston – but its long history doesn’t stop there. Originally built above a crowded fish market, City Hall has always entertained a lively commercial market, and today the towering structure sits relatively small among downtown's massive skyscrapers. Remnants of that long and lively history can be seen at the City Hall Farmers' Market located just outside the City Hall Reflecting Pool on Wednesdays in the spring from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., where local farmers sell everything from coffee to broccoli. Inside Houston City Hall you’ll find various notable items all harkening back to the great lawgivers that came before us. From the aluminum medallions to the great marble stairways and specially cast aluminum doors, City Hall is both a step back in time and a contemporary look at modern law making.
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Mission San José
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Mission San Jose, also known as San Jose y San Miguel de Aguayo, is the largest mission in San Antonio, TX. Due to its size, it was known as the Queen of the Missions. It was established in 1720 and completed in 1782, and it was built with Texas limestone and brightly colored stucco. The mission was surrounded by fields and had livestock, as well as its own gristmill and granary, which have been preserved. Spanish missions weren't just churches, but communities with the church as the main focus. At its height, Mission San Jose provided sanctuary and a social and cultural community for more than 300 Indians.

Mission San Jose's church dome and roof collapsed in 1874, and its church tower collapsed in 1928. Luckily in the 1930s, the Works Progress Administration (WPA) almost fully restored Mission San Jose to its original design. More recently, the mission underwent massive historically accurate renovations which were completed in 2011.

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More Things to Do in Texas

San Antonio Historic Market Square

San Antonio Historic Market Square

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San Antonio’s Market Square is a vibrant Mexican marketplace, featuring crafts, entertainment and food from south of the border. Shops and stalls sell Mexican fabrics, pottery, leather goods, toys and jewelry, and the central El Mercado is the largest Mexican market outside Mexico.

Market Square is a great place to graze on Mexican tortillas and enchiladas, plus a farmers market specializes in Southwestern and Mexican produce.

For a sit-down meal, visit the famous 24-hour Mi Terra Cafe for Tex-Mex cuisine served under twinkling Mexican lights. While you dine and shop, Market Square entertainment includes strolling musicians and cultural shows.

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Morgan's Wonderland

Morgan's Wonderland

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Hard Rock Cafe San Antonio

Hard Rock Cafe San Antonio

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The Hard Rock Café San Antonio has been a staple of the city's River Walk since its opening in 1995. The café provides three floors of patios from which you can enjoy signature food and drinks, listen to rock n’ roll classics, and look out over the tourist boats on the San Antonio River from Texas’ No. 1 tourist destination. Like other Hard Rock Cafes around the world, the Hard Rock Café San Antonio features music memorabilia on the walls. Be sure to tour the restaurant and see various guitars, platinum records, and more. The Hard Rock Café San Antonio features Ozzy Osbourne’s black velvet jacket, Eddie Van Halen’s Charvel guitar, and a brick wall spray painted by Aerosmith during the 1994 groundbreaking ceremony. The Hard Rock Café San Antonio offers space for large events of up to 400 guests as well, so is a perfect spot for a wedding reception or conference. You can reserve a patio, space inside the café, or even their private dinner barge.
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USS Lexington

USS Lexington

1 Tour and Activity
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Dealey Plaza

Dealey Plaza

This public Dallas park was completed in 1940 and named for George Bannerman Dealey, a civic leader, early publisher of The Dallas Morning News and an advocate for the revitalization of the area. Most notably, Dealey Plaza is also where President John F. Kennedy was assassinated on Nov. 22, 1963. In 1993, the National Park Service designated Dealey Plaza a National Historic Landmark District, encompassing the area between Pacific Avenue, Market Street, Jackson Street and the former railroad tracks. John F. Kennedy Memorial Plaza is located about a block away from Dealey Plaza.

Located at Dealey Plaza, the Sixth Floor Museum presents the social and political landscape of the early 1960s, chronicles President Kennedy’s assassination and its aftermath, and reflects upon his lasting impact on the United States and the world. The museum is located on the top two floors of the former Texas School Book Depository.

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