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Salt Pond Bay
Salt Pond Bay

Salt Pond Bay

Free admission

The Basics

While Salt Pond Bay attracts visitors to its beautiful sandy beach, it’s also a popular spot for hiking on the island. Both the Drunk Bay and Ram Head Trails start here. Since the bay is a longer drive from Cruz Bay than other St John beaches, it doesn’t feature on as many tours (and doesn’t get as crowded). The exception is tours that circumnavigate the island; these typically stop at Salt Pond Bay, as well as Cinnamon Bay, Hansen Bay Beach, Hawksnest Beach, Trunk Bay, Maho Bay, and Francis Bay. It’s an excellent way to experience the diversity of beaches on the island.

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Circle the Island of St. John | Lunch stop at Lime Out (Taco Boat)
Likely to Sell OutLikely to Sell Out
Circle the Island of St. John | Lunch stop at Lime Out (Taco Boat)
$182.50 per adult
Traveler Favorite
Amazing experience!
Jimmy and Carly were amazing! Jimmy navigated past storms to get us to the snorkeling spots. Lime out was incredible! Highly recommend!
Daniel_W, Oct 2021

Things to Know Before You Go

  • Salt Pond Bay is a great option for beach goers looking to escape the crowds.
  • Salt Pond Bay doesn’t have much shade, so bring an umbrella.
  • Don’t forget your swimming gear, beach towel, and reef-safe sunscreen.
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How to Get There

Salt Pond Bay can be accessed from Route 10 as it runs through the center of the island. The easiest way to get there is to drive or take a bus from the Cruz Bay ferry dock. A short hike leads to the sand.

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When to Get There

Since it rarely gets as crowded as other St John beaches, Salt Pond Bay makes for a great visit just about anytime the weather is nice. Consider coming in the late afternoon to make the hike to Ram Head for sunset.

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Wildcard

Snorkeling in Salt Pond Bay The waters of Salt Pond Bay are protected with very little surf, making this a prime spot for snorkeling. Swim out to the rock hump in the center of the bay, where you can observe sea turtles feeding in the seagrass beds, as well as rays and giant hermit crabs.

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