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Basílca de la Macarena
Basílca de la Macarena

Basílca de la Macarena

Calle Bécquer 1, Seville, Spain, 41002

The Basics

The Seville basilica opened in 1949, but its distinctive madonna, likely the work of sculptor Pedro Roldán, dates to the 17th century. Inside, find a single nave with four side chapels, with the distinctive Virgin of the Macarena over the main altarpiece. The basilica also houses a museum featuring religious artifacts such as processional robes and matador outfits, gifts from bullfighters. Most guided Seville tours include a stop at the basilica to see La Macarena.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Basílica de la Macarena is a must-see for visitors interested in Seville’s cultural and religious history.

  • Area tours often include a stop at the Basílica de la Macarena.

  • It’s free to enter the basilica and see the shrine of the Virgin, but the museum charges admission.

  • The museum houses the church’s famous Holy Week floats.

  • Out of respect, wear long pants and cover your shoulders to enter the church.

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How to Get There

The Basílica de la Macarena is located on Calle Bécquer near Calle San Luis in northern Seville’s Macarena District. Parking is limited. Take local bus line 3 to the Macarena stop or the C2 or C3 buses.

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When to Get There

The basilica is open daily but closed for mass. Holy Week (Semana Santa) is when Basílica de la Macarena really shines, as it plays a pivotal role in one of Spain’s great religious celebrations, with 50 processions and dozens of religious floats. La Macarena is carried in this parade over a path of rose petals while people sing songs of her beauty.

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La Macarena Wore Black

Matadors have historically given gifts to La Macarena in hopes of protection inside the ring. The most famous of them is José Ortega (known as Joselito), who gifted the five emerald brooches that adorn the statue. He won his bullfights for eight years, until he was fatally gored in 1920, prompting national mourning throughout Spain. La Macarena was adorned in black following that fatal fight for the first and only time in history.

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