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La Malbaie
La Malbaie

La Malbaie

La Malbaie, Quebec City, Canada

The Basics

Outdoor activities in La Malbaie are popular year-round, whether it’s skiing on the Mont Grand-Fonds slopes, hiking in Haut Gorge National Park, catching a whale-watching cruise from Baie St. Catherine, or riding Malbaie’s 3.7-mile (6-kilometer) bike path along the St. Lawrence River.

Casino Charlevoix contributes to La Malbaie’s reputation as a popular destination, drawing nearly a million visitors each year to its casino games, golf course, and historical hotel, the Manoir Richelieu. To get a sense for the area’s rich past, visit the Musée de Charlevoix, which showcases the region’s history, heritage, and folk art.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • La Malbaie is ideal for outdoors enthusiasts.

  • Visit Manoir Richelieu for sweeping views of the St. Lawrence River.

  • Most water-based activities halt around November when the river freezes over.

  • Many regional businesses are accessible to wheelchair users.

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How to Get There

La Malbaie is located off of routes 138 and 362, about 87 miles (141 kilometers) northeast of Québec City.

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Trip ideas

Food Lover's Guide to Quebec City

Food Lover's Guide to Quebec City

How to Spend 1 Day in Quebec City

How to Spend 1 Day in Quebec City

Things to Do in Quebec City This Winter

Things to Do in Quebec City This Winter


When to Get There

La Malbaie is most known as a summertime getaway with plenty of warm-weather activities, including boat rides and water sports on the St. Lawrence. In October you can catch the brilliant colors of fall foliage. When the river freezes over in winter, you can hit the slopes, snowshoe, or relax in the warmth of the area’s cozy chalets.

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Canada’s Best-Kept Secret

La Malbaie’s Cabot Gardens, known to locals as Les Jardins de Quatre-Vents (Gardens of the Four Winds), is said to be Canada’s best-kept secret. Designed and endowed by revered horticulturalist Francis Cabot, the elaborate Cabot Gardens mimics elements from gardens across the world, from India to Japan.

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