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St Paul’s Pillar
St Paul’s Pillar

St Paul’s Pillar

Free admission
Ayia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa, Paphos, Cyprus

The basics

St. Paul’s Pillar is in an archaeological complex that holds the remains of the colossal fourth-century basilica, Panagia Chrysopolitissa, as well as several other religious structures, including the still-functioning Agia Kyriaki Church, which is also known as the “Church by St. Paul’s Pillar.”

An elevated pathway winds through the site offering views of columns and mosaics, as well as information panels. The site is, together with Paphos Archaeological Park, the Tombs of the Kings, and the Rock of Aphrodite (Petra Tou Romiou), among Paphos’ biggest drawcards, and is commonly seen as part of hop-on hop-off bus tours. Multi-day tours of Cyprus also stop here.

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Things to know before you go

*St. Paul’s Pillar is a must for Christians and history buffs. *The Panagia Chrysopolitissa site is wheelchair and stroller-accessible. *The sun in Paphos can be intense, so wear sunscreen and a hat. *If you plan on entering Agia Kyriaki Church, which hosts Greek Orthodox, Anglican, and Catholic services, be sure to dress modestly.

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How to get there

St. Paul’s Pillar is situated within the Panagia Chrysopolitissa archaeological site in Kato Paphos, less than 10 minutes’ walk from the harbor. Find the pillar near the western edge of the basilica.

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When to get there

The vast majority of sightseers get to St. Paul’s Pillar some time between mid-morning and mid-afternoon, with many tour buses arriving during this period. Try going in early morning or late afternoon to beat the crowds.

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Frequently Asked Questions
The answers provided below are based on answers previously given by the tour provider to customers’ questions.
Q:
What are the nearest attractions to St Paul’s Pillar?
Q:
What else should I know about attractions in Paphos?
A:
As well as visiting the St Paul’s Pillar, check out these trip ideas to make the most of your visit: