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Panagia Chrysopolitissa Church (Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa)
Panagia Chrysopolitissa Church (Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa)

Panagia Chrysopolitissa Church (Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa)

Free admission

Originally built in the fourth century, this early Christian basilica was destroyed during Arab attacks in the seventh century, and another church was built on the site in the 13th century. Though only remnants of the original survive, the foundations and scattered columns give an impression of scale, while mosaics showcase the artistry involved.

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Daily from 8am-1pm and 2pm-5pm.
Ayia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa, Paphos, Cyprus

The basics

Panagia Chrysopolitissa Church sits on an archaeological site that also features the still-functioning Agia Kyriaki Church and St. Paul’s Pillar. A pathway runs through the site, and boards are placed at strategic locations providing information to visitors. The church is often visited as part of tours of Paphos, which typically also stop at Paphos Archaeological Park. Multi-day tours of Cyprus also make stops here on itineraries that combine visits to Paphos, Nicosia, and the Troodos Mountains.

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Things to know before you go

  • Panagia Chrysopolitissa Church is a must for history buffs.
  • The site is wheelchair-accessible.
  • Wear sunscreen and a hat, and bring along water, as there is little shade and it can get hot here.
  • Dress conservatively if attending a service at the multi-faith Agia Kyriaki Church.
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How to get there

Panagia Chrysopolitissa is in Kato Paphos. The best way to get there is on foot. Walking from the harbor or from the Kato Paphos Main Bus Station should take less than 10 minutes.

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When to get there

The site is usually quiet and tranquil, even during high season. Go early or late in the day to avoid the hot midday sun.

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St. Paul’s Pillar

To the west of the Panagia Chrysopolitissa Church sits a rather plain-looking marble column that, if it weren’t for the small plaque in front of it, would probably go unnoticed. This pillar is said to be the site where St. Paul was tied up and whipped in the first century. The apostle was persecuted by the Romans for attempting to spread Christianity in Cyprus, though he was eventually successful in his mission, with the Roman governor of Cyprus Sergius Paulus ultimately converting.

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Frequently Asked Questions
The answers provided below are based on answers previously given by the tour provider to customers’ questions.
Q:
What are the nearest attractions to Panagia Chrysopolitissa Church (Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa)?
A:
Attractions near Panagia Chrysopolitissa Church (Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa):
Q:
What else should I know about attractions in Paphos?
A:
As well as visiting the Panagia Chrysopolitissa Church (Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa), check out these trip ideas to make the most of your visit: