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Orpheum Theatre
Orpheum Theatre

Orpheum Theatre

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33 Reviews
126 2nd Ave, New York City, New York, 10003

The Basics

Mixing music, theater, and visuals,Stomp is one-of-a-kind entertainment. Unconventional “instruments,” such as matchboxes, brooms, garbage cans, and Zippo lighters fill the stage with energizing beats played by talented performers meant to get you dancing in your seat. In spite of its long run, the show is still wildly popular. High demand, coupled with the theater's small size of just 347 seats, means it's advisable to book well in advance to guarantee admission.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Orpheum Theatre is a must-visit for lovers of the theatrical arts and New York history.

  • The theater has accessible seating for wheelchair users.

  • The show runs approximately one hour and 45 minutes and does not include an intermission.

  • Children must be at least 4 to attend the performance.

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How to Get There

To reach the Orpheum Theatre by public transportation, take the 6 to Astor Place or the R or W to Eighth Street - NYU, both just a few blocks away, for about a 5-minute walk from the theater. You can also take the L to Third Avenue, which is about half a mile (.8 kilometers), or about a 10-minute walk.

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When to Get There

Typically there is an evening performance on Tuesdays through Sundays and an additional matinee on Saturdays and Sundays. It is recommended to arrive at least 15 minutes before curtain up in order to find your seats and get settled.

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History

The site occupied by the Orpheum is thought to have been a concert garden as early as the 1880s, making it one of the oldest continuously operating entertainment sites in New York City.

During the heyday of Yiddish theater, the venue was the Player's Theatre, and was part of the "Jewish Rialto" (also known as “the Yiddish theater district”) along Second Avenue. By the 1920s, it was largely exhibiting films, but was converted back to theatrical use in 1958.

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