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Experience your destination with peace of mind. Learn what steps operators are taking to keep you safe and search for activities with increased health and safety measures. Before you go, check local regulations for the latest information.

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Things to Do in New Orleans

With live music floating out from Bourbon Street bars, revelers milling through the French Quarter, and the scent of fresh-baked beignets thick in the air, New Orleans thrums with an energy all its own. Due to its blend of Creole, Cajun, Spanish, and French influences, the Big Easy boasts uniquely Southern food, music, and culture best experienced through a guided city tour, a Cajun cooking class, or even a cocktail-focused tour. Those travelers interested in the supernatural will enjoy the variety of haunted cemetery tours, as well as the opportunity to learn about the history of voodoo in New Orleans. The city’s proximity to several historic plantations, such as Oak Alley and Laura plantations, means history buffs with have their sightseeing work cut out for them. Hop aboard a traditional steamboat to take a spin around Natchez Harbor—some cruises include dinner and drinks—or take a seat on a swamp boat or air-boat tour to explore the bayou and learn about the ecosystem’s unique flora and fauna. With everything NOLA has to offer—from live music in the Marigny and Treme districts to bar-hopping on Magazine Street—you won't have a hard time letting the good times roll in Crescent City.
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Carrollton, New Orleans
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Talk to a local about Carrollton and they’ll give you directions to one of New Orleans’s signature neighborhoods in the Garden District. Because while Carrollton is commonly known as a street, it was once its very own town, completely independent of the greater city of New Orleans. Yes, Carrollton was destined to be annexed by New Orleans in the early 20th century, but the Carrollton of yesteryear and the Carrollton of today both boast the picturesque Oak Street as its “Main Street” and offer guests a unique view into one of the beating hearts of New Orleans’s cultural hotbeds.

With a laid-back feel and beautiful architecture throughout, Carrollton is an attraction just walking through – though you needn’t take the sidewalk if you don’t want to: The St. Charles Line Street Car takes you into Carrollton by way of St. Charles Ave. Exploring Carrollton means discovering Queen-Anne and Victorian homes, oak-lined streets, and restaurants catering to all budgets.

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Louisiana Children's Museum (LCM)

Fun for all ages, the Louisiana Children’s Museum has got everything you need to entertain you and your young ones for hours on end. Over 30,000 square feet of fun with everything that might spark interest or creativity, in the Louisiana Children’s Museum not only do kids get to be kids, but adults get to have fun and partake as well. Play shop in the Little Winn-Dixie grocery store, pretend to captain a tug boat down the mighty Mississip’ with a working crane, launch ping-pong balls off of self-made rollercoaster ramps, take apart modern technology, or leave a lasting impression in the glow-in-the-dark booth. Arts and crafts are also encouraged, as the museum’s ethos is to educate as well as entertain.

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Musee Conti Wax Museum

Something of an odd bird among wax museums, this wax museum is more than your average museum (wax or no). The Musee Conti Wax Museum tells the varied and sordid stories of New Orleans in chronological order, from French colonization to modern Haitian Voodoo. A historical wax museum, this particular attraction features what other museums can’t: a mise en scene of New Orleans’ most notable figures including historical greats like Andrew Jackson and Jean Laffite, to cultural heroes like Huey P Long and Louis Armstrong.

A signature experience befitting the unique nature of New Orleans, there can be few other attractions that both enlighten and entertain like the Musee Conti Wax Museum.

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New Orleans Oak Street

It’s true – Bourbon Street may be New Orleans’s most famous street, but it’s far from the only one to visit if you’re looking for some good times New Orleans-style.

Located in the historic Uptown district of New Orleans, Oak Street was once the main commercial drag of the town of “Carrollton” before its incorporation into greater New Orleans in the early 20th century. Because of that, there’s still a lingering charm to this uptown “main street” as a business and entertainment center.

Thanks to an economic resurgence in the 1970s and 80s due to some generous funding from state and federal dollars, Oak Street has seen some magic in recent years, and today, this one-time high street of barber shops, clothing stores, and blues bars is back on the map.

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Entergy Giant Screen Theater

The Entergy IMAX Theatre, located within the Audubon Aquarium of the Americas, gives visitors the chance to get even more acquainted with marine life on a massive screen. Learn about the local aquatic life of southern Louisiana, or take a visual journey across the world’s oceans.

Featured films include the Audubon Society’s award-winning Hurricane on the Bayou, which combines the music of New Orleans with an overview of the destruction left on the landscape and natural wetlands of Southern Louisiana by Hurricane Katrina. The theater also plays feature films about animal life on land, featuring the unique wildlife and landscapes of Kenya and Madagascar. At over five stories tall, this IMAX is the largest theater in the Gulf south area and makes nature documentaries a sensory experience.

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Mississippi River
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So much can be said about the Mississippi that it almost defies belief. So much more than just the largest drainage system in North America, the might Mississippi is entrenched in the collective American psyche. From the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn to Beasts of the Southern Wild, the grand idea of the muddy river delta and its great abundance stays with us. Beginning in the far reaches of Canada, the long arms of the mighty Mississippi reach across the United States and eddy down the flat belly of America and out through the Louisiana river delta. While in New Orleans you can stand on the banks of this muddy river and be intoxicated at its briny smell, the tugboats and tankers that regularly parade its banks, and get a sense of what it means to be standing at the beginning of something.

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Oak Alley Plantation
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Famed for the ancient live oak trees that flank its main walkway, the Oak Alley Plantation might seem eerily familiar. Used as a site for several movie screenings including the popular Interview With A Vampire, the Oak Alley Plantation is, in real life, all the more beautiful and exciting. A sprawling plantation with over 1300 acres to its name and an interactive Civil War museum, visitors to Oak Alley enjoy the beauty of the grand antebellum plantations with a historical walking tour. A 17 ft-wide veranda and opposing doors and windows provide shade and cross-ventilation for the main house during hot summer days, but what makes a trip to Oak Alley memorable isn’t the beautiful architecture - it’s the lush grounds themselves, the mossy oak trees, and the stories of bygone days. These will have you imagining yourself sipping a mint julep and laughing as part of what was once the magnificent southern aristocracy.

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Honey Island Swamp
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Renowned as one of the wildest and most unspoiled swamplands in the United States, the murky, algae-coated waters of the Honey Island Swamp are a prime habitat for native wildlife, including alligators, but if you believe the legends, the lake is home to an even more menacing resident. The notorious Honey Island Swamp monster has long been a figure of local legend, although the alleged sightings of the mysterious Big Foot like creature are yet to be proven.

Stretching for 18 miles (30 km) and surrounded by dense forest and overhanging cypress trees, the wetlands are best explored by boat, where you’ll paddle through the shallow backwaters and have the chance to spot wild boar, raccoon, mink, otters and turtles, along with a huge variety of birdlife.

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More Things to Do in New Orleans

Laura Plantation

Laura Plantation

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Steeped in history far richer than the former plantation owners could have dreamed of owning, the Laura Plantation lies just beyond the reaches of the Greater New Orleans area. Originally built in 1804 by a French naval veteran of the American Revolution by the name of Guillaume Duparc, the plantation was erected on the site of an old Colapissa Indian village. A Creole-owned sugar plantation, the Laura Plantation differed from most plantations in its Code Noir ethics, its somewhat removed societal circumstances, and its beautiful sprawling sugar plantation landscape.

Touring this iconographic plantation, you’ll learn the difference between Creoles and Cajuns, hear chilling ghost stories, and see how a bygone way of life now heralds itself as one of the top Louisiana cultural attractions.

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Destrehan Plantation

Destrehan Plantation

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Located just 25 miles upriver from New Orleans, Destrehan Plantation is not just the oldest plantation house in the Lower Mississippi Valley, but is an easy, accessible step back in to antebellum times. Built in 1787, the Destrehan Plantation retains its southern charm while keeping its ancient oak trees, its flat marshy lawns, its Old South antiques and a wonderful, quiet stillness. See architectural influences from the Spanish and French, listen to stories from costumed tour guides about the daily life of the people that ran Destrehan, and get a feel for the way things were in this little but remarkably old corner of the US.

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Houmas House

Houmas House

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Locals call this beautiful plantation the Crown Jewel of Louisiana’s River Road, partly because of its rich history and partly because of its incredible old-world architecture. Established as a sugar farm around 1803, Houmas House was open to the public in 1963. The traditional southern plantation home has seen its share of generals, Union forces and colonels, too. The same gardens, mansion and peaceful grounds that drew men in search of respite in times of war, draw travelers today who are in search of a nearby escape from the energy and gluttony of the Big Easy.

Daily tours treat visitors with true Southern hospitality and welcome them to the grounds not as tourists, but as guests. Expert guides lead travelers through the elaborate halls of the plantation’s mansion, through galleries of antiques and art, and across the well-kept grounds of the Houmas Gardens. It’s a one-of-a-kind experience that’s available only south of the Mason-Dixon Line.

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St. Joseph Plantation

St. Joseph Plantation

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For those that want an authentic southern experience, a visit to the St. Joseph Plantation is a must. One of the few remaining fully intact sugar cane plantations in the south, St. Joseph plantation includes original slave cabins, a detached kitchen, blacksmith’s shop, carpenter’s shed, the main manor home, and a schoolhouse that fully rounds out the plantation experience.

Built in 1880, this amazing antebellum plantation and manicured gardens is appreciated by museum goers for providing one of the most opulent offerings of what life was like in the pre Civil War south when the sugar cane industry was booming. A unique look into a living past, a walk through the St. Joseph Plantation is a walk through time as you enjoy a fascinating glimpse into the lives of the many interesting people who have called this plantation "Home." Many tours are even guided by family members themselves.

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Napoleon House

Napoleon House

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In New Orleans’ French Quarter lies the Napoleon House, a monument to the city’s illustrious heritage and culinary tradition. Built in 1814 by former Mayor Nicholas Girod, the property is most famous for supposedly being offered by the mayor to Napoleon Bonaparte as a refuge after the Frenchman’s exile in 1821. Napoleon never made it to the house, but the name stuck and the building became one of the most famous bars and cafes in the city.

For the past 200 years, Napoleon House has been a frequent stop for numerous artists and writers, and today the National Historic Landmark is open for visitors to enjoy a signature muffaletta and Pimms Cup while absorbing both the architecture and atmosphere.

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San Francisco Plantation

San Francisco Plantation

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The designation of being the most opulent plantation house in North America doesn’t come cheaply. Nor will you find the San Francisco Plantation mansion in any disrepair. A galleried house of the Creole open-suite style, this fabulous southern home’s riches aren’t just found on its sprawling property or wrapped up in its gorgeous architecture – the San Francisco Plantation has one of the finest and most extensive antique collections in the country. Reminiscent of Versailles and steeped in a history of rich antebellum living, slavery holdings, and sordid stories of love, wealth, death and honor, the San Francisco Plantation is not just a visit to any ordinary plantation home – it’s a surreal pastiche down history lane.

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Port of New Orleans (Port NOLA)

Port of New Orleans (Port NOLA)

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If you’re at the Port of New Orleans, you’re most like beginning or ending your cruise, so get there a day early or stick around afterward for a chance to explore the Big Easy.

The French Quarter is, of course, the main attraction, but if you’ve been there, done that, take a shore excursion into the countryside to see some of Louisiana’s grand plantation homes, or experience the swampy waterways on an airboat tour. You’ll dock downtown at either the Julia Street or Erato Street terminal. Both terminals are on the Riverfront Trolley Line, which will take you a mile up the Mississippi River to the French Quarter.

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Hard Rock Cafe New Orleans

Hard Rock Cafe New Orleans

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Court of Two Sisters

Court of Two Sisters

The Court of Two Sisters restaurant is a historic New Orleans institution. Named after sisters Emma and Bertha Camors, the three-story building is a piece of Louisiana history that sits on Governor’s Row, the 600-block of Royal Street. Emma and Bertha came from an aristocratic Creole family and exemplified New Orleans high society with their formal gowns, lace and perfumes all imported from Paris. The sisters were very close and even died within two months of each other in 1944.

The Court of Two Sisters has one of the largest courtyards in New Orleans and today welcomes visitors looking to enjoy authentic southern cuisine. One of the most popular options is the jazz buffet brunch; morning hot dishes include made-to-order omelets, eggs benedict, bacon, sausage, grits, shrimp pasta and more. Afternoon offerings are specialties like turtle soup, oysters Bienville, duck à l’Orange, Creole jambalaya and shrimp étouffée.

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