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Things to Do in Kanto - page 2

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Shinjuku Golden Gai
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42 Tours and Activities

Famous for its architecture and nightlife, this small neighborhood in the heart of Tokyo is comprised of narrow alleys and passages lined with roughly 200 informal bars, clubs and food stalls. Old school buildings are just a few feet wide, some of the most popular bars seat only five or seven people, and streets are so narrow that travelers must walk single file.

Despite these cramped quarters, Golden Gai is a popular destination for visitors to Tokyo and draws local artists, musicians and writers to local watering holes. With the highest number of bars per square meter in the world, this lively spot is the perfect place to pop in for a drink, meet some locals and experience the girt (and charm) of Tokyo night life. Travelers say most bars charge a cover, but once inside, drinks are cheap and strong.

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Akihabara
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64 Tours and Activities

Akihabara, also called Akihabara Electric Town, is the go-to district in Tokyo for electronics, anime and manga products. Hundreds of electronics stores line the neighborhood streets, selling everything from computer parts to home goods and ranging in size from small stalls to mainstream chains. North of Akihabara Station sit stores selling video games, popular manga comic books, card games, costumes and souvenirs.

In recent years, Akihabara has become famous for its "otaku" culture, or diehard anime and manga fans. It is a great place to people-watch and see "cosplay," short for costume play, in which fans dress up as their favorite characters in anime and manga. Numerous maid cafes are found in this area as well, where you’ll find a dining experience in which the servers dress as maids and other characters.

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Daibutsu (Great Buddha of Kamakura)
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The 47-foot (14-meter) tall bronze Buddha statue of Kotokuin (Great Buddha of Kamakura) is only the second tallest statue of Buddha in Japan though likely the most recognizable. The seated figure is that of Amitabha Buddha, worshipped by Japanese Buddhists as a deity of salvation. The statue was completed in 1252 after the site’s previous wooden Buddha and its hall were damaged in a tsunami in 1248. Hundreds of years later, you can still see traces of the original gold leafing. The identity of the artist who cast the statue remains a mystery.

The temple of Kotokuin where the Buddha statue resides falls under the Jodo Sect of Buddhism, the most widely practiced branch of the religion in Japan. While the Great Buddha is the real draw, visitors can tour the temple grounds to see the four bronze lotus petals originally cast as part of a pedestal for the Buddha, as well as the cornerstones of the hall that originally sheltered the statue.

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Nakamise Shopping Street
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52 Tours and Activities

For kitschy souvenirs and trinkets to bring home as gifts or mementos of your time in Japan, there’s really only one place to shop, and that’s Nakamise Street. The name roughly translates to “Street of Inside Shops,” and you’ll find both sides lined with stores selling knickknacks, souvenirs and snacks.

The shopping street owes its existence to the Senso-ji Buddhist temple, dating back to the seventh century. The temple has drawn in enough devotees over the centuries to spawn a thriving commercial district. The shops once served as homes for the temple servants who cleaned the grounds, but now it’s wall to wall shops. Here you’ll find folding fans, kimonos and their accompanying wooden sandals, Edo-style colored glassware and the typical lineup of tourist trinkets. Save room in your stomach to sample some of the traditional Japanese snacks sold along the street, particularly the savory rice crackers, Azuki bean paste and sticky rice cakes.

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Ueno Park (Ueno Koen)
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49 Tours and Activities
Ueno Park is a public park made up of museums, historical landmarks, and natural beauty. It houses the Tokyo National Museum, the National Science Museum, and the Tokyo Metropolitan Fine Art Gallery. Other popular attractions include the Tōshō-gū Shrine, a zoological garden, the Shinobazu Pond, and an abundance of cherry trees. The southern entrance of Ueno Park is guarded by a statue of Saigō Takamori, an influential samurai from the Meiji period. It stands in front of the Tokyo National Museum, which has about 100,000 art pieces and the National Science Museum, exhibiting life-size representations of different forms of life. Nearby is the Tōshō-gū Shrine which was built in 1617, across from the lovely Shinobazu Pond. Next to this is the Ueno Zoo, which houses rare and exotic wildlife. Cherry blossoms surround the zoo and the park, and during cherry blossom season it is where the Japanese hold hanami parties that celebrate these special trees.
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Shinjuku Park (Shinjuku Gyoen)
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41 Tours and Activities

You'll want to grab an (english language) map upon entering this large park that stretches across Shinjuku and Shibuya. There is a lot of ground to cover here.

The park is split into gardens of three distinct styles: French formal, English landscape and Japanese traditional. Not surprising the Japanese section is the most interesting and beautiful with waterlily ponds, artfully trimmed bushes and statues. The nearby Taiwan pavilion is an elegant spot for photos.

The original gardens date back to 1906, but were destroyed and rebuilt after the war. The diverse and well manicured gardens are great for wandering, taking photos or having an afternoon picnic. The garden has over 1500 cherry trees trees that burst into vivid blooms in late March or early April. It's a favorite spot for blossom viewing and can be very crowded during those times.

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Nikko National Park
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43 Tours and Activities
The Nikko National Park is home to Buddhist shrines, incredible lakes, mountains, and natural beauty. It is renowned for its Botanical Garden, the intricate Iemitsu's mausoleum, and the Toshogu Shrine, which is the most ornate and lavish shrine in all of Japan. The Toshogu Shrine is Nikko's main attraction. A mausoleum dedicated to the founder of the Tokugawa shogunate, the shrine was designed by over 15,000 craftsman in two years, and is distinguished for its rich colors, elaborate carvings, and ornate details in gold leaf. As for the Iemitsu's mausoleum, it is known as Taiyuinby, and is more traditional in design. It is part of the Rinnoji Temple, which is dedicated to the Buddhist monk who introduced Buddhism to Nikko.
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Omotesando
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38 Tours and Activities

Omotesando is an attractive, well-groomed, tree-lined street between Shibuya and Minato in Tokyo. Designed as an entranceway to Meiji Shrine, the street pays homage to the deified spirits of Emperor Maiji and his wife, Empress Shoken.

In modern years, Omotesando has earned a reputation as one of the most fashion-forward neighborhoods in the world, with high-end shops all within close range of one another. Some of the brands featured in this area include Louis Vuitton, Prada and Dior. Due to its chic style, Omotesando is also a prime location for people-watching. Many of Tokyo's elite can be found shopping and dining here.

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Hama Rikyu Gardens
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Considered to be Tokyo’s best green space, the Hama Rikyu Gardens offer a Central Park-like experience with Tokyo’s skyscrapers towering in the background. The sprawling garden originally served as the duck hunting grounds for Tokyo’s feudal lords more than 300 years ago. Today, the pools, bridges, ponds, tea houses and viewing pavilions are perfect for a quiet morning or afternoon outdoors.

Birdwatchers can spot the herons, ducks and other migrating birds who take up residence around the many ponds. For a different kind of wildlife spotting, visit the park’s most unique asset, a saltwater tide pool that rises and falls with the ocean. The teahouse on an island in the middle of the tidal pond is a pleasant place to sit back, relax and enjoy the scenery. Hama Rikyu certainly isn’t one of Tokyo’s best spots for cherry blossom viewing in spring, but you’ll still be able to see them and without the crowds of the city’s more popular viewing points.

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Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park
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The Hakone National Park, known as the Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park, is the most incredible outdoor-excursion in Japan. With relaxing hot-springs, Lake Ashi, and of course, Mt. Fuji, The Hakone National Park is a nature-lover's paradise.

Divided into four general areas, including the Hakone area, Mount Fuji area, Izu Peninsula, and the Izu Islands, there is much to see in this park. In Hakone, you’ll encounter Lake Ashi, also known as Lake Ashinoko, with Mt. Fuji as its backdrop. Another popular destination in Hakone is Mt. Kintoki, filled with the ruins and shrines of old-Japan.

Then, there is the legendary Mount Fuji. At 12,388 feet (3,776 meters), Mt. Fuji is Japan’s highest mountain. With spectacular, 360-degree views of Lake Ashinko, the Hakone mountains, and the Owakudani Valley, climbing Mt. Fuji is an unforgettable experience.

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More Things to Do in Kanto

Roppongi

Roppongi

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Ten years ago, a visit to the Roppongi district of Tokyo meant you were either visiting an embassy or going out to party with the foreigner community. While Roppongi remains one of Tokyo’s best nightlife districts, particularly with foreigners, the city of Tokyo has successfully broadened the appeal of Roppongi to include foreigners, locals and domestic tourists with a wider variety of entertainment options.

Perhaps the most influential and much-anticipated development project was of Roppongi Hills, a behemoth modern shopping and entertainment complex housed at the base of Mori Tower. Apart from the upscale shopping options, Roppongi Hills is home to the Mori Arts Center Gallery, Mori Art Museum and Tokyo City View, a viewing platform with 360-degree views from 820 feet (250 meters) above ground.

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Owakudani

Owakudani

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Travel about 60 miles (100 kilometers) out of Tokyo and into Kanagawa Prefecture and you’ll find yourself in the Great Boiling Valley of Owaku-dani. The live volcanic valley makes for one of the most enjoyable -- and smelliest -- day trips from the big city. The area has long appealed to domestic and foreign tourists for its beautiful scenery, hot springs, occasional scenic views of Mount Fiji and for black eggs, eggs that are hard boiled in the sulfurous waters, turning their shells black.

A short walking trail leads from the base of the Hakone Ropeway past bubbling sulfurous pools to a tourist stand where you can purchase black eggs. Local legend claims that eating a single egg will extend your life by seven years. From the Owaku-dani tourist station, you can either return on the Hakone Ropeway or continue to hike up to the peak of Mount Kamiyama and nearby Mount Komagatake. From there, a ropeway will ferry you down to beautiful Lake Ashi.

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Hakone Ropeway

Hakone Ropeway

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An hour train ride west of Tokyo sits the mountainous area known as Hakone, an area known for its views of some of Japan’s most famous natural sites. Domestic and international tourists have been coming here for decades to gaze upon snowcapped Mt Fiji, Lake Ashi and the Great Boiling Valley. On a clear day, the best way to enjoy the sights is on the Hakone Ropeway, the second longest cable car in the world.

The 30-minute journey on the Swiss-made cable cars stops at three stations along the way; for the best photo op of Mt Fiji in the distance, hop of at Owakudani Station. Pack a swim suit for a dip in one of Japan’s famous onsen, volcanic-heated sulfuric hot springs. The entire ropeway extends 2.5 miles (4 kilometers) and hangs 427 feet (130 meters) above a large crater at its highest point.

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Memory Lane (Omoide Yokocho)

Memory Lane (Omoide Yokocho)

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Located in Tokyo’s popular Shinjuku ward just north of the world’s busiest rail station, you’ll find a small alley called Omoide Yokocho. The historic alley, known locally as Memory Lane or Piss Alley depending on who you ask, is in fact one of Tokyo’s more authentic and atmospheric dining destinations.

Don’t let the negative nickname deter you. Today, it’s a bit of a misnomer anyway. In 1999, the entire alley was destroyed in a fire. It has since been rebuilt in much the same way and with the same old world Postwar Tokyo atmosphere, but with one notable exception. The alley now has bathrooms. The nickname “Piss Alley” harkens back to the days when no such facilities existed. As you walk down the narrow alley, you’ll see tiny bars and restaurants tightly packed together on either side with the occasional tattered red paper lantern lighting the way.

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Ameyoko Shopping Street (Ameya-Yokocho)

Ameyoko Shopping Street (Ameya-Yokocho)

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Ameyoko Shopping Street, short for Ameya Yokocho (candy store alley), is one of Japan’s most popular shopping streets, famous throughout Tokyo for its cheap prices and the wide variety of products on offer.

As the name suggests, the alley was once filled with candy shops. In the years following World War II, candy shops gave way to black market stalls selling illegally imported American goods. Today, you won’t find much of either. What you will find is a range of clothing, accessories, cosmetics, spices and foods in more than 400 shops. For many locals, the New Year season means taking a shopping trip to Ameyoko to pick up traditional New Year’s foods like fish cakes, crab and roe. Even if you’re not in the market for Japanese food products, a stroll down Ameyoko Shopping Street still makes for an enjoyable experience. Soak up the atmosphere, pick up some souvenirs and sample some traditional street snacks from the local vendors.

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Tokyo National Museum

Tokyo National Museum

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Robot Restaurant

Robot Restaurant

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The Robot Restaurant in Shinjuku's Kabukicho district (red-light district) may well be unlike anything you’ve seen before. A sort of sci-fi Japanese cabaret starring giant robots, this show is loud and proud, both visually and audibly, with its flashing lights, multiple mirrors, and huge video screens accompanied by the sounds of taiko drums and pumping techno music.

There are four 90-minute shows every night, in which dancers in dazzling costumes perform alongside robots, giant pandas, dinosaurs and more. At one point, neon tanks come out to do battle with samurais and ninjas. It’s a surreal place that needs to be seen to be believed!

There are several options for attending the show. You can pre-purchase entrance tickets for several different time slots, or you can bundle the entrance ticket with a dinner package.

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Hakone Open-Air Museum

Hakone Open-Air Museum

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The Open-Air Museum in the suburb of Hakone is an easy train ride from Tokyo and a great place to spend a sunny day. This sculpture park contains hundreds of works by both Japanese and Western artists ranging from elegant to surreal and spread out over 200 acres.

Bring your camera, because many surprising photo opportunities await you: a massive three-ton head turned on it's side, vibrant dancing geometric shapes and giant zombie hands that reach into the sky in an ode to the movie Shaun of the Dead. Start your tour at the rainbow colored stained glass tower with a staircase to the top for a view of the massive park. All of the sculptures are framed by naturalistic trees, fields and mountains. Kids (and possibly adults) will enjoy the massive Children's Pavilion with it's innovative and colorful play structures.

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Kokugikan Sumo Stadium & Museum

Kokugikan Sumo Stadium & Museum

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The Kokugikan Sumo Stadium, also known as the Ryōgoku Kokugikan, is Tokyo’s largest indoor sports arena hosting sumo wrestling tournaments. Sumo is Japan’s most popular sport, so catch an incredible show with up to 10,000 other spectators and find out what sumo is all about.

Each Sumo tournament lasts fifteen days, and the matches begin with amateurs and end with advanced sumo wrestlers. Tournaments are held only six times a year, so grab a seat while you still can.

The Sumo Museum, known as Nihon Sumo Kyokai, is attached to the Kokugikan Sumo Stadium and is open year-round. It is a great place to learn about sumo’s important place in Japanese culture.

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Engaku-ji Temple

Engaku-ji Temple

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Engaku-Ji Temple is a nearly perfect example of Zen Buddhist architecture. Located in the city of Kamakura, to the south of Tokyo, it is one of the most important temple complexes in Japan and ranked second among Kamakura's Five Mountains, or monasteries.

The temple was founded in 1282 by a Chinese Zen monk and has withstood numerous fires and other rials over the last 750 years. It's the oldest example of Tang Chinese architecture left in Japan. The most prominent features are the 16th century reliquary hall, which claims to house one of the Buddha's teeth, and a huge 14th century temple bell. Engaku-ji is prettiest to visit in Autumn when the vibrant fall foliage accentuates its minimalist lines. Inside the park area are numerous tea houses, restaurants and gardens.

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Tokyo Metropolitan Government Office (TMG)

Tokyo Metropolitan Government Office (TMG)

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The Tokyo Metropolitan Government Office, more commonly known as Tokyo City Hall or Tochō, is one of the most distinctive and famous buildings in the Tokyo skyline. Tokyo is a huge city and their governmental offices are huge too, taking up three city blocks with three immense buildings.

The tallest is Tokyo Metropolitan Main Building No. 1, built to resemble both a computer chip and a gothic cathedral. It splits at level 33 into two twin towers which stretch to a height 48 stories, making it the tallest building in the city for many years.

Both towers have observation decks free to the public on level 45, 202 meters high. On really clear days, you might even spot Mt Fuji to the west. The view from the southern tower is considered slightly better but the northern tower remains open later, making it more suitable for night viewing.

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Hanazono Shrine (Hanazono Jinja)

Hanazono Shrine (Hanazono Jinja)

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Tokyo’s Hanazono Jinja Shrine is famous for its open-air antique market that is held on Sundays throughout the year. Antique markets have been held on shrine grounds for centuries. Hanazono’s market is famous for its deals on traditional kimonos, used books, art prints, and hanging scroll art, along with various antiques. In addition to the antiques market, the shrine is famous for two annual festivals. Tori-no-Ichi festival is held every November and is known for its varied and extensive comedy performances. The Bon Orodri Festival is held every August and allows guests to participate in traditional Bon dancing.

Established in the mid-17th century, Hanazono Jinja Shrine is one of Tokyo’s most historic and important Shinto shrines. Over the last several hundred years it has been damaged extensively in multiple fires, the worst of which occurred during World War II. To repair the damage, it has undergone multiple renovations and rebuilds.

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