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Room of the Last Supper (Cenacle)
Room of the Last Supper (Cenacle)

Room of the Last Supper (Cenacle)

Free admission
Mount Zion, Jerusalem, Israel

The Basics

When visiting the Room of the Last Supper, also called the Upper Room, you will notice a mix of architectural styles and decoration. Franciscan monks renovated the building—which also houses King David’s Tomb—in the 14th century. It was a mosque for hundreds of years, and today it is controlled by Israel and run as a synagogue. The room’s Gothic-Christian windowsills, Arabic stained-glass window panes, and Crusader-Gothic arches reflect the combination of religious and cultural influences over centuries. From the roof there are fantastic views of the Dormition Abbey and Mount of Olives.

Some private and small-group tours of Jerusalem visit the Room of the Last Supper along with other Old City must-see sights.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The Room of the Last Supper is ideal for religion and history enthusiasts.

  • Admission to the room is free, and members of all faiths are welcome.

  • Dress modestly (including head covering) when visiting this and all religious sites.

  • The site is accessible to wheelchair users.

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How to Get There

The room is located on an upper floor of King David’s Tomb on Mount Zion, outside of Jerusalem’s Old City walls and 328 meters (100 meters) southwest of Zion Gate. You can easily reach the popular site by car, taxi, or bus from within Jerusalem.

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When to Get There

The Room of the Last Supper is open from 8am to 5pm daily. Peak tourist season in Jerusalem is June to October, so consider a spring visit for pleasant temperatures and smaller crowds.

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King David’s Tomb

Just outside of the walled Old City of Jerusalem, King David’s Tomb is considered by some to be the burial place of King David of Israel—but whether he was actually buried there is highly debated. Nevertheless, throngs of visitors enter the crypt, a hall of the Crusader Church beneath the Room of the Last Supper, which features a cloth-covered tomb in the center. There are separate entrances for men and women, and visitors of all faiths are welcome.

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