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Things to Do in Hobart

Hobart, the capital of the Australian island state of Tasmania, is enjoying a tourism renaissance. More and more visitors are discovering its maritime charm and surrounding natural beauty. Stroll the bustling streets perched on Sullivans Cove and the Derwent River, and those along the waterfront, lining one of the deepest natural ports in the world. Alive with shops, restaurants, cafes, and craft breweries—be sure to stop by Cascade Brewery—there is plenty to keep urbanites interested for days. City walking tours help navigate the scene, and some take travelers in search of outdoor pursuits up to kunanyi/Mt. Wellington, a basalt giant covered with scrubby vegetation. Mountain biking and bushwalking are the best ways to explore the mountain, and at 4,166 feet (1,270 meters), you’re in for a view of the surrounding landscape on clear days or an otherworldly feeling on foggy, cloud-shrouded days. Exploring Hobart proper can also include forays to the Richmond Historic Village for a dose of the past, and the Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary to meet some native animal inhabitants—some of whom are endangered. Hobart is also a popular departure point for further exploration of Tasmania, and myriad full-day and longer tours hit the island’s highlights. Bruny Island offers wildlife encounters and gourmet delights amidst breathtaking scenery. Cruise among the rugged Tasman Peninsula’s towering coastal cliffs, sea caves, and native marine life. Or get a history lesson at Port Arthur’s UNESCO-listed convict colony ruins.
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Cascade Brewery
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14 Tours and Activities

For beer tastings and a glimpse inside a historic brewery, book a tour of the 180-year-old Cascade Brewery, the oldest in Australia. The 1.5-hour tours of this Gothic brewery include tastings and insights into the brewery process, plus lots of stair-climbing to work up a thirst.

Dress comfortably but safely to tour the brewery, wearing long trousers and flat shoes, rather than sandals. After the tour, take a wander around the brewery’s large landscaped gardens or relax in the cafe. Cascade brews premium lager, barley blonde-style beer, stout and pale ale, and the label features the trademark Tasmanian tiger.

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Mt. Wellington (Kunanyi)
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Standing sentinel over Hobart, Mt. Wellington is known by locals simply as ‘the Mountain.’ A visit to the Pinnacle is an essential Hobart experience.

At the Pinnacle you’ll find a glass lookout building and boardwalks. In every direction the views of Hobart, all the way to the sea, are incredible.

The weather can change very abruptly up here, and it’s often freezing or can even be snowing when fair Hobart Town is experiencing mild weather.

If you’re feeling active, come to Mt Wellington to go bushwalking, bike riding, horse riding or rock climbing, or pack some lunch to enjoy at the sheltered Springs picnic area.

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Cascades Female Factory Historic Site
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This all-female prison is one of 11 places that make up the Australian Convict Sites World Heritage Property. Between 1788 and 1853 approximately 25,000 women—and even some of their children—were held in one of Cascade’s five structures. High rates of illness and infant mortality, as well as grim conditions led to tragic ends for many of the inmates who were forced to sew and mend to repay their debts to society.

Three of the five original buildings are open to the public, so visitors can see the heavy stone walls and thick metal bars that held so many women captive. The Matron’s Quarters in Yard 4 provides travelers with details about the lives of civilians who were charged with punishing and reforming Cascade’s wayward women. This female factory is a fascinating introduction to Tasmania’s role in convict transportation for Great Brittan.

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Battery Point
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This quiet suburb just south of Hobart was established in 1818, and while extravagant houses and luxury homes now dot the landscape of this prestigious town, a walk through its shaded streets offers visitors a look at how Tasmanians used to live.

The old warehouses of Salamanca Place are still visible from atop Kelly’s Steps, a series of hand-carved stairs built in the 1800s. Travelers can explore Battery Point’s colonial past at the Narryna Heritage Museum, then trek to the town’s highest point at St. George’s Anglican Church, built in 1936.

No trip to Battery Point is complete without a visit to Arthur Circus—one of the nation’s first official subdivisions. Today, visitors can wander around the original cottages, which are now some of the most expensive and sought-after homes in the area.

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Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens
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The Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens opened in 1818 and its impressive collection of indigenous plants, trees and unique Asian-inspired gardens span some 35 acres of scenic countryside. Perhaps the garden’s most unusual exhibit is the Subantarctic Plant House, which displays plants from the remote Macquarie Island. In addition to environmental conditions that mimic the wild, audio from the island—like sounds of Elephant seals and penguins—is also piped throughout the space, giving visitors a full sensory experience.

After wandering the grounds, relaxing by the lily pond or exploring the French Memorial Garden and Fountain, stop by the Royal Tasmanian’s restaurant, which sources produce from its very own vegetable garden for a truly Tasmanian farm-to-table experience.

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Hobart Convict Penitentiary
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This chapel, nicknamed "The Trench", designated for male convicts in Hobart Town was a less than holy place. With poor ventilation, 36 solitary confinement rooms and separate punishment chambers hidden beneath the chapel floor, it was truly a spot for torture and despair. The dark cells, referred to as “dust holes” were deemed inhumane and closed in 1849, but visitors can still catch a glimpse of the horrid conditions on a Penitentiary tour, where guides remind guests about the terrible sounds that could be heard coming from convicts chained beneath the floors.

The grounds include a prison yard, barracks, punishment chambers and an execution yard, as well as the chapel, which was partially transformed into courtrooms in 1859. Visitors who opt for the ghost tour can wander the tunnels and gallows by lamplight while hearing stories of the more than 30 individuals who were executed here.

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Constitution Dock
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Nowhere is Hobart’s communion with the sea more evident than Constitution Dock, where commercial fishing boats share the harbor with sailboats and luxury yachts. Each summer, Constitution Dock is the ending point for the Sydney-Hobart sailing race, which is generally regarded as one of the world’s most challenging offshore races. Even during other times of the year, however, Constitution Dock is a buzz of activity with visitors and Hobart locals, as fishermen hoist up crates full of fish, and waterfront restaurants serve some of Australia’s freshest fish and chips. When visiting the coastal Tasmanian capital, the dock is the perfect place for a stroll and feeling the city’s pulse. In the area surrounding Constitution Dock, many of Hobart’s historic buildings all line the action-packed waterfront, where buskers, fishermen, merchants, and tourists combine to create an energetic, yet authentic Tasmanian scene.

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More Things to Do in Hobart

St. David's Cathedral

St. David's Cathedral

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Maritime Museum of Tasmania

Maritime Museum of Tasmania

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Hobart’s heart lies on the sea, and as an island Tasmania’s history is inextricably bound to the water. If you’d like to learn more about Tasmania’s maritime history, the Maritime Museum of Tasmania provides all the answers.

You’ll see models of the ships that docked at Sullivans Cove, hear the stories of the men who sailed in them, learn about Australia’s first explorers and see the navigational instruments they used. The watercraft of Tasmania’s original inhabitants, the Aborigines, are also displayed, along with artifacts rescued from shipwrecks, photographs, paintings and whaling equipment.

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Sullivan's Cove

Sullivan's Cove

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Queens Domain

Queens Domain

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The name suggests this hilly bushland is ruled by royalty, but the grassy fields of Queens Domain were actually designed for the Tasmanian people. In 1860, the then governor ruled this park that passes along the Derwent River become a community green, with meeting halls, barbecues and picnic areas for gathering with family and friends.

Queens Domain is a perfect place to people watch on a sunny afternoon, or relax after a visit to the nearby Tasmanian Botanical Gardens. Visitors can take a dip at the Hobart Aquatic Centre or play a match at Hobart International Tennis Centre. Enjoy a leisurely walk over the scenic Tasman Bridge after unwinding at Queens Domain and then enjoy dinner at one of the nearby restaurants.

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Parliament House

Parliament House

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Originally, when this Georgian-style, 19th-century building was built near Sullivan’s Cove, it was destined to be a custom’s house for Hobart’s developing trade. As the politics of the island increased, however, and “Van Diemen’s Land”—as it was then known, grew as an independent colony, the building was chosen to house the customs, as well as the city’s Parliament. Today, Hobart’s Parliament House has been a hub of politics since 1841, and is still the site where Parliament and lawmakers gather to govern the state.

On a guided tour of the Parliament House, learn the fascinating history of the building and all of its renovations, as well as tour the underground basement full of history, legends, and lore. On the outside of the buildings, the surrounding Parliament House gardens are a relaxing place to either go for a stroll or rest in the shade of an oak, before venturing over to Constitution Dock or nearby Salamanca Market.

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North Hobart

North Hobart

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In the Tasmanian capital of Hobart, hip locals head to North Hobart and its main strip, Elizabeth Street, to visit its restaurants and coffee shops, bohemian bars, boutiques, bakeries and live music venues. A real “eat street,” Elizabeth Street cuisine ranges from Turkish to Spanish tapas, Indian to modern Australian. It’s also popular to visit North Hobart’s delis which sell local Tasmanian produce. With plenty of atmosphere day or night, on 375 Elizabeth Street the independent State Cinema is an institution that’s over 100 years old. Inside there’s a curated bookstore, rooftop cinema, and coffee shop.

A good spot for brunching and people watching, from North Hobart there are great views of downtown with Mount Wellington towering over the city. Wander the back streets off Elizabeth Street to check out the old Hobart homes, and to check out the street art and murals along Tony Haigh Walk.

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South Hobart

South Hobart

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Lark Distillery

Lark Distillery

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Hobart Runnymede

Hobart Runnymede

Though Australia as a country is relatively young when compared to the rest of the world, Hobart as a city is relatively old when compared to the rest of Australia. This scenic port town on the island of Tasmania is Australia’s second oldest city, and at the Runnymede House just north of town, visitors can walk through a domestic time portal to a Tasmanian era long gone.

Originally constructed around 1836 for Tasmania’s very first lawyer, the Runnymede House is a fascinating look at 19th-century Tasmania. Though an Anglican Bishop also lived in the house, it took the name “Runnymede” when a salty ship captain—Charles Bayley—bought the house and subsequently named it after his favorite boat. For 100 years the Bayley family lived in the humble homestead, and since the furniture and belongings are such prime examples of middle-class living at the time, the house is administered by the Australian National Trust as a well-preserved window to the past.

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Hobart Sandy Bay

Hobart Sandy Bay

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Louisa's Walk

Louisa's Walk

In Hobart, the must-see theater experience happens on Louisa’s Walk. This two-hour experiential performance takes visitors on a journey through time, following the story of Louisa Ragan, a poor Irish mother of three whom in 1841 was thrown in jail and given a seven-year sentence for stealing a single loaf of bread.


Audience members follow the Hobart Rivulet and wander through scenic parkland as actors Judith and Chris Cornish play out scenes from Luisa’s grim tale. Visitors witness her crime, arrest and transportation to a women’s prison, and learn a bit of history while walking towards the Cascades Female Factory. This institution is one of the 11 buildings that comprise the Australian Convict Sites World Heritage Property. Women like Louisa were sent her to do laundry and needlework to repay their debts to society.

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Bruny Island

Bruny Island

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Outdoor activities, fishing and relaxing are your reasons for coming to Bruny Island, off Tasmania’s south-east coast. Two north and south islands joined by a long narrow isthmus, Bruny is a favorite destination for weekending Hobart residents and visitors wanting to escape the rat race.

Along with surfing and exploring the wild windswept coast, spotting wildlife is a highlight of a visit to Bruny Island. If you’re lucky, you might spot penguins, echidnas, mutton birds and cormorants.

The vibe is low-key on Bruny, with no resorts just holiday homes and guesthouses. There are a few shops for supplies and a museum detailing the history of the island and the explorers who came here, from Bligh to D’Entrecasteaux. The lighthouse is one of the island’s few landmarks.

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