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Things to Do in Hawaii - page 4

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Paradise Cove Luau
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One of Hawaii’s most popular luaus is held beside swaying palms and a stunning sunset at Paradise Cove. A Hawaiian village at Paradise Cove highlights island arts and crafts, and cultural activities include net fishing, the Imu underground oven ceremony and of course the hula.

After being greeted with a traditional floral lei and tropical mai tai, relax into the evening with a full Hawaiian buffet and tropical drinks. Transportation can be included as a package, along with souvenirs, deluxe seating and drinks.

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Lahaina
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The city of Lahaina on the western coast of Maui is, today, sometimes seen as simply a way to get to the beaches of Kaanapali. If you're just passing through, however, you're missing the town's charms completely.

Lahaina was once the royal capital of the Kingdom of Hawaii, from 1820-1845, and many of the attractions in the historic district date from that era – including the old cemetery, where you'll find royal graves, and a defensive fortress with reconstructed walls. Later, the city's economy was built on the whaling industry. Visitors today, however, come by the thousands to go whale watching rather than hunting. The Lahaina Historic District is the center of tourism in the town, with several 19th century attractions to check out, and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1962. In addition to the historic attractions and whale watching, you can also enjoy snorkeling, surfing, sightseeing cruises, and luaus.

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Oahu North Shore
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For many visitors, Oahu’s North Shore means one thing: surfing! World-famous Waimea Bay and the Banzai Pipeline are sacred sites to surfers the world over, and some big-name surfing contests are held here.

The main town is Haleiwa, a pretty boating harbor surrounded by beaches. For wannabe surfers it’s a particularly good place to take lessons or improve your board skills.

In summer, nearby Waimea Bay is a popular snorkeling spot, and beachcombers hit the rock pools when the tide is out. The Banzai Pipeline lies just offshore.

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Kewalo Basin
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In the heart of downtown Honolulu, just across the street and two blocks west of Hawaii’s largest mall, is the small boat harbor of Kawalo Basin and the starting point for a number of popular Honolulu water-based adventures. Deep sea charter fishing vessels moor alongside snorkel and scuba charters, parasailing vessels, winter whale watch pontoons, underwater submersible tours and even an 83-foot pirate galleon complete with water-firing cannons for daytime family fun or evening debauchery. If you’re looking to get beyond the beaches of Waikiki and out into the big blue, a stroll along its street-side dock will, at the very least, display your varied options.

Though there is no beach access here, a gentle but ridable wave that breaks left of the harbor channel is a popular surf spot with local groms (kids in surf speak). In addition to hosting the Rip Curl GromSearch competition, the break is a training ground for the Kamehameha High School surf team.

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Kualoa Ranch
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Family-owned Kualoa Ranch is a one-stop adventure playground in Oahu. Dating back to 1850, the cattle ranch is a popular location for horse-riding tours and all-terrain trails.

Scenically, the ranch embraces a variety of Hawaiian landscapes, from fertile countryside to rugged mountains and tropical white-sand beaches.

You may recognize some of the locations you’ll see from horseback or off-road ATV, as the ranch has hosted many TV and film crews, including Jurassic Park, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Five-O and Lost.

Narrated bus tours point out famous locations, along with other historic and cultural sites.

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Honolulu
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Let the vowels and loopy sounds roll slowly off your tongue—without even picturing the golden sands and palm trees swaying in the breeze, even saying the word “Honolulu” can make a person smile. Every year in Hawaii’s capital, where surfboards, sunsets, and taking it slow are simply a way of life, millions of visitors from around the globe all gather to soak in its warmth.

While the beaches and waves are what Honolulu is best known for, there’s much more to Honolulu than simply the front of a postcard. The capital of the Hawaiian Kingdom was here at ‘Iolani Palace, and the museums, temples, and historic homes are windows to Old Hawaii. Get lost in the markets of Chinatown or pay a visit to Pearl Harbor, and let your palette explore the local farm to table cuisine. Catch a show at a downtown theater or hit the late night clubs, or rise with the sun for a standup paddle off the shores of Waikiki.

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Waikiki
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Waikiki pretty much embodies the ancient spirit of aloha: oceanfront high rises, white sand beaches, world-class dining and some of the world’s best surfing certainly explains the neighborhood’s alluring magnetism. The name Waikiki as such means spouting fresh water in the native Hawaiian language; it refers to the streams and springs that formerly fed the wetlands separating Waikiki from the interior. Once a playground for Hawaiian royalty, and now a playground for the rich and famous of the entire planet, Waikiki has become one of the most iconic beaches in the world and draws millions of visitors every year – and with most hotel rooms being just a block or two from the ocean, it’s easy to understand why.

But more than just glitz and glory, Waikiki is really mostly about surf. What could possibly be most picturesque than learning the basics of surfing at the foot of Diamond Head State Monument and by boys who were taught everything they know by local celebrity.

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Kealakekua Bay
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For some of the best snorkeling on the Big Island, visit the protected waters of Kealakekua Bay. This remote area is also popular with hikers, who might come across the ruins of ancient temples and villages on their travels. Dolphins frolic in the bay, and the shore is dotted with the white obelisk commemorating the death of Captain James Cook here in 1779.

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Waimea Canyon
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Known as the Grand Canyon of the Pacific, Waimea Canyon is a wild and wonderful river gorge. Carved over the millennia by the volcanic activity and the floodwaters of the Waimea River, the red rock canyon measures up 16 km long, and 900 m deep. Known for its spectacular views and hiking trails, Waimea Canyon offers plenty of scenic lookouts, picnic areas and nature trails.
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More Things to Do in Hawaii

Dole Plantation

Dole Plantation

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For a fun day out in the Hawaiian countryside, discover Oahu’s pineapple heritage at the Dole Plantation. What started out as a fruit stand in the middle of the pineapple fields in 1950 is now an extremely popular Hawaiian attraction.

The Dole pineapple empire was founded more than a century ago by the Pineapple King, James Dole. Visit his original pineapple plantation to tour the living museum housed in a traditional plantation home. Exhibits trace the history of Dole and his pineapple industry, but there’s far more than history to be found here.

Get lost amongst Hawaiian plants in the world’s largest maze, ride the Pineapple Express train through the fruit fields, take a garden tour of the hibiscus, bromeliads and other tropical flowers, and dine on island cuisine at the Plantation Grille.

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Waiʻanapanapa State Park

Waiʻanapanapa State Park

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The legendary “Road to Hana” drive seems to indicate that the town of Hana itself is the goal, but you'd be crazy to miss a visit to Wai'anapanapa State Park.

Spending some time in Wai'anapanapa State Park is reason enough to stay overnight in Hana. It's a lush and gorgeous park just outside of Hana, and one of its most well-known features is the small black sand beach of Pa'iloa. It's a beautiful beach, to be sure, lovely for swimming or simply sunbathing, but there's more to this park than just a beach. Wai'anapanapa has two underwater caves you can visit that are filled with a combination of fresh and salt water. You can go swimming in these pools, too. This area also has historical significance, too, as you'll see when you visit the ancient burial sites. There is also a trail that winds three miles along the coast, from the park all the way into Hana Town itself.

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Paia

Paia

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Once a little sugarcane town, tiny Paia was brought to world notice by the windsurfers who discovered its first-class waves. It’s now known as the windsurfing capital of the world. The town’s old plantation-style wooden buildings are now home to funky bars and restaurants, craft shops, surf stores and art galleries. The town’s windsurfing hub is nearby Ho'okipa Beach. Pull up a towel and watch the surfers in action, or head to calmer Baldwin Beach for a paddle.

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Ko Olina

Ko Olina

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Although it is often referred to as a resort, Ko Olina doesn’t describe a property in particular. It is, in fact, a master-planned vacation and residential community containing several upscale resorts, like the Aulani Disney Resort & Spa, the JW Marriott Ihilani Resort & Spa and Marriott's Ko Olina Beach Club. The area is famous for its pristine, man-made beach coves (the sand was imported from Lanai!) that are very popular with swimmers. Their creation was more a necessity than a caprice, as the ocean tends to be quite turbulent in these parts; the rock levies encase the lagoons for safer sea ventures.

The destination is famous for its unparalleled golfing opportunities, including the LPGA Lotte Championship (women's professional golf tournament on the LPGA Tour).

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Kaʻanapali

Kaʻanapali

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Hawaii’s first planned resort town, Ka'anapali is a consistent favorite with visitors, with numerous hotels and condominium complexes sharing the prime waterfront location along Ka’anapali Beach. Once named America’s Best Beach, the spot offers three miles of sand and warm, swimmable water. Families play on the shores, keeping eyes open for a possible whale swimming in the distance. Tour boats depart directly from the sand during whale-watching season, which runs through the winter.

Along with numerous restaurants, there are a variety of stores located in Ka’anapali’s open-air Whalers Village shopping mall. Throughout the day, free Hawaiian entertainment, like hula dancing and lei-making lessons, are offered to guests. A walkway runs in between the beach and the line-up of resorts and businesses, making it easy to forget about the car and stroll from one spot to the next. There’s always a fun crowd of folks moving about.

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Royal Lahaina Luau

Royal Lahaina Luau

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The Royal Lahaina luau is a family-friendly evening of oceanfront entertainment set inside of Ka’anapali’s Royal Lahaina resort. More economical than some of the larger shows in town, children will love getting on stage and trying their hand at the hula, and adults will love the buffet of Hawaiian food and open-bar of tropical drinks. Mai-tais and Blue Hawaiians are paired with luau classics such as kalua pig, lomi salmon, and bowls full of poi, and everyone can agree towards the end of the night that the fire dancers are the overall highlight. Oftentimes, the twirling staffs are a fitting end to a fiery sunset which has given way to darkness, the last rays having disappeared over the horizon which is visible from your oceanfront seat.

Since the Royal Lahaina luau is located in the Ka’anapali resort district, the luau grounds are only a short drive from neighboring hotels, or, if you’re staying in the immediate vicinity.

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Kona (Kailua-Kona)

Kona (Kailua-Kona)

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Often called Kailua-Kona, and referring to the western Kona Coast district as a whole, Kona is on the leeward (dry and sunny) side of the Big Island.

The Kona Coast is the Big Island’s vacation central, with good weather, watersports, great beaches, Hawaiian temples, museums, restaurants and shops. The annual Ironman Triathlon is held here in October. While you’re here, sample the local Kona coffee, follow the scenic oceanfront drive to Kailua Pier, visit the former royal palaces of Kamakahonu and Hulihee, and drop into Hawaii's first church.

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Lanikai Beach

Lanikai Beach

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While we can’t exactly claim it as fact, there’s a good chance that at some point in time Lanikai Beach was a finalist for a Corona commercial. With sand as white as the clouds above and water which is a welcoming and rich shade of turquoise, this tranquil beach on Oahu’s windward shore is the Hawaii you’ve always dreamed of.

Because it’s on the island’s eastern shore, Lanikai is often graced with gentle tradewinds which cool you just to the point of comfort. Afternoons in the summer months can get a little blustery, although kitesurfers and windsurfers who have launched from Kailua Bay opt to make the most of the wind and zip across the turquoise waters which are capped in flecks of white.

Since Lanikai is set in a private neighborhood the beach is accessed by simple footpaths and isn’t too visible from the road, and while this semi-isolation thins out the crowds, it also means there aren’t any facilities and parking can come at a premium.

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Wailua River

Wailua River

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Kauai’s Wailua River runs from the volcanic Wailua crater to the coast, flowing through the Wailua River State Park.

It’s Hawaii’s only navigable river, so make the most of the experience with a boat tour or cruise into the island’s rugged interior. Along the way, you’ll pass waterfalls, nature reserves and walking trails as the river slowly meanders its way inland. The river’s highlights are Fern Grotto, Wailua Falls and Secret Falls, reached by a secluded walking trail.

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Halona Blowhole

Halona Blowhole

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Once visitors are aware that hālona means “lookout” in Hawaiian, it becomes quite clear what the Halona Blowhole is about: views, Pacific Ocean and blowhole! The Halona Blowhole is one of the most spectacular natural wonders on O’ahu Island; the more than 1,000-year-old geyser-like rock formation is characterized by a hole which propels incoming surf in a narrow, molten lava tube, shooting sea spray high into the air as a result - sometimes up to 30 feet. This is mostly a summery phenomenon but wintertime also has a big ticket item drawing visitors: humpback whales. The lookout point offers unobstructed views of the O’ahu shoreline as well as glimpses of Lanai and Moloka'I Islands on clear days.

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Banzai Pipeline

Banzai Pipeline

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The Banzai Pipeline, one of the most famous surf breaks along Oahu’s Seven Mile Miracle, is known by wave riders the world over. This is no beginners’ break: Pipeline has earned its reputation as one of the most intense on the planet. The danger here is the same thing forms its ridable tubes—an abrupt and shallow coral shelf that causes the water mounds to topple quickly and very close to the shoreline. Experts try their luck when Pipeline pounds between October and April with waves heights averaging 15 feet.

As one might imagine, with surf crashing close to shore, Pipeline is a sight to behold even for landlubbers. Gawkers come out in droves to see the spectacular sunsets over the tropical waves, but especially to see the pros shred it. The Billabong Pipe Masters’ challenge—the final competition in the World Surf League’s competitive season and culminating event of the Vans Triple Crown of Surfing—selects its winner here each December.

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Hana

Hana

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Hana is a community on the eastern end of Maui, and it might remain largely isolated if not for the spectacular scenery on the Hana Highway that draws visitors in droves.

Hana Town itself has a small population, although there's a constant influx of travelers. It's hot and humid year-round, but you'll be able to escape the tropical conditions at any one of the many excellent beaches in and around Hana – including a black sand beach at Waianapanapa State Park, and Hamoa Beach (sometimes called Hawaii's most beautiful beach).

The Hana Highway – also known as the Road to Hana – meanders more than 50 miles along the northern shore of Maui and leads to the community of Hana. If you've got the time, the best way to travel the Hana Highway is slowly, stopping frequently to check out waterfalls, beaches, and breathtaking views.

Along with the many attractions along the Road to Hana, there are also historic and scenic points of interest in Hana Town itself.

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Haleakala National Park

Haleakala National Park

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Haleakala National Park protects the world’s largest dormant volcano, Haleakala Crater. Exploring its huge expanses, it’s easy to see why haleakala means ‘house of the sun’.

The park is divided into two sections: the crater and the coastal area around Kipahulu.

Visitors come here to hike the wild lunar landscapes, with overnight treks particularly popular. Sunrise is an amazing sight over Haleakala, and the park is also well worth visiting at night, when the star-filled sky is crystal clear.

On the coast, the landscape is more lush, with fern-shaded pools and tumbling waterfalls to cool off in.

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Hanakao'o Beach Park

Hanakao'o Beach Park

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