Recent Searches
Clear

Travel update: We’re doing our best to help keep you safe and your plans flexible. Learn more.

Read More

Things to Do in Hawaii - page 3

Category

Bishop Museum
star-4.5
85
6 Tours and Activities

For the lowdown on Polynesian lore, legend, history and anthropology, drop into the Bishop Museum. Far from dry, displays range from woven hats, sculptures and scientific exhibits to planetarium shows and historical artifacts.

Take a welcome tour, view the plants of the Pacific, watch a lava-melting demonstration or hear island oral history. There’s also a calendar of events, activities and exhibitions to entertain the kids, from circus acts to hula shows.

Read More
Honolulu Museum of Art
star-4
20
3 Tours and Activities

What is formerly known as the Honolulu Academy of Arts is the leading museum of its kind the state of Hawaii, and hosts one of the largest single collections of Asian and Pan-Pacific art in the United States at 50,000 objects. It represents all the major cultures of Hawaii and spans 5,000 years, from ancient times to today. Founded by esteemed local missionary Anna Rice Cooke in 1927 in Honolulu’s most beautiful Hawaiian-style building, the museum continues to present international caliber exhibitions along with its permanent collection, which is home to world-class pieces by none other than Van Gogh, Monet, Picasso and Warhol.

The museum actually encompasses several building, scattered over 3.2 acres near downtown Honolulu; it features the Spalding House, the Doris Duke Theatre, the Robert Allerton Art Library, the Art School and the Shangri La Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art.

Read More
Queen Emma Summer Palace
star-5
3
4 Tours and Activities

For 83 years, Kings, Queens, and regal monarchs ruled the Hawaiian Kingdom. One of the most controversial—and eventually beloved—monarchs was the half-Hawaiian Queen Emma, whose Caucasian background led many to argue she wasn’t fit to be Queen. Nevertheless, she would end up marrying King Kamehameha IV and become heavily involved in philanthropy—even setting up the Queen’s Medical Center that is Oahu’s main hospital today. During the peak of summer, however, Queen Emma would escape the Honolulu heat at her home in Nu‘uanu Valley.

Read More
Lyon Arboretum
5 Tours and Activities

Twenty minutes. That’s all the time that is takes to be transported from the white sand beaches of Waikiki, up to the waterfall-laden wilds at the back of Manoa Valley. Here, where cliffs rise vertically over 2,000 feet and it rains nearly every day, visitors will find one of Hawaii’s foremost tropical botanical gardens. Managed by nearby University of Hawaii, the Lyon Arboretum spans 193 acres and has over 5,000 species of plants. Given the cool, wet conditions—it rains over 165 inches per year here—the forested amphitheater is the perfect setting for researching tropical plants.

Take an hour to stroll from the parking lot back to Inspiration Point, and reap the rewards of the casual walk with a view looking out at the valley. Along the journey you might encounter up to 25 species of birds, including the endangered amakihi which calls the arboretum home.

Read More
Kapiolani Park
19 Tours and Activities

Even as early 1877, the Hawaiian Royalty recognized the need for preserving open space. With the city of Honolulu rapidly growing, King David Kalakaua—the last reigning King of Hawaii—allocated 130 of Waikiki’s acres towards a park for the people of Hawaii. Naming it after his beloved wife—Queen Kapiolani—the park today offers sprawling green fields for locals, visitors, and families.

In addition to the soccer fields, tennis courts, and jogging paths, the park also houses the Honolulu Zoo and public art shows on the weekends. For special events, the Waikiki Shell is a performance venue set in the middle of Kapiolani Park, where some of the world’s largest musical acts will throw concerts, benefits, and shows just minutes from Waikiki Beach. The Honolulu Marathon—held every December—usually finishes at Kapiolani Park, and even during other times of the year, this is a happening place for Honolulu residents to escape the city rush.

Read More
Honolulu Zoo
star-4.5
34
10 Tours and Activities

The shriek of the Honolulu Zoo’s population of endangered white-handed gibbons is a familiar morning sound to Waikiki’s regular surfing contingent; the zoo is just across the street from some of the most popular beginner surf breaks toward the far end of Waikiki near Diamond Head crater. In addition to the monkeys, the sprawling 42-acre open-air zoo is home to more than 900 tropical animals including elephants, black rhino, giraffe, Sumatran tiger, aardvark, meerkat, orangutan, birds, reptiles and more. The zoo also houses animals only found in Hawaii, including the state bird, the nēnē, as well as a number of endemic plants in and around the enclosures.

Read More
Manoa Falls
star-4.5
113
10 Tours and Activities

Located at the back of Honolulu’s lush Manoa Valley, Manoa Falls is a 150 ft. waterfall which is accessible by a one-hour hike. It’s the perfect distance for those wanting an easy workout, and it’s close enough to the city that you can squeeze in a visit if you only have a couple of hours.

Parking for the falls is $5 and is in the parking lot by the Rainbow’s End snack shop, and this moderate trail weaves its way between swaying stands of creaking bamboo and the sweet scent of eucalyptus. After .8 miles the trail emerges at majestic Manoa Falls, and the flow is highly dependent upon the amount of recent rainfall. On some days this can be a thundering torrent of jungle whitewater, whereas on other days (particularly in summer) the falls can be reduced to little more than a trickle.

Regardless of season, however, the shaded trail is often wet, and mud can line the narrow trail during pretty much every day of the year.

Read More

More Things to Do in Hawaii

Saddle Road (Hawaii Route 200)

Saddle Road (Hawaii Route 200)

17 Tours and Activities

Like a lonely ribbon of black asphalt across the Big Island’s empty bosom, Saddle Road provides the fastest means of driving between Hilo and Kona. There was once a time when this remote stretch of highway was one of the worst roads in Hawaii, but substantial improvements and re-paving have made it accessible and open to cars.

From Hilo, Saddle Road climbs through residential neighborhoods towards a lush, mist-soaked rainforest. The green of ferns is gradually replaced by the brown of desert scrub brush, and fog is common as the road climbs toward 6,600 feet in elevation. Passing between the summits of Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa—Hawaii’s dueling 13,000-foot mountains that are often snowcapped in winter—the road passes the turnoff for the Mauna Kea Visitor’s Center, where stargazers gather each evening. Cell phone service is spotty on Saddle Road, and for the entire duration of its 48-mile stretch there are no gas stations or supply shops.

Learn More
Koko Crater

Koko Crater

14 Tours and Activities

Koko Crater is where locals head when they’re in need of a really good workout, and it’s also a popular visitor attraction thanks to the stunning views from the top. In order to reach the summit, however, you’ll first need to conquer the 1,048 steps that run in a straight line up the mountain. The steps themselves are actually railroad ties left over from WWII, and while the first half of the steps are moderately steep, it’s the final push to the 1,100-foot summit that make your legs really start to burn.

The reward for reaching the top, however, is unobstructed, 360-degree of the southeastern section of O‘ahu. Gaze down towards Hanauma Bay and the turquoise waters of the crater, and watch as waves break along Sandy Beach and form foamy ribbons of white. Neighboring Diamond Head looms in the west and is backed by Honolulu, and the island of Moloka‘i—and sometimes Lana‘i—float on the eastern horizon.

Learn More
Magic Island

Magic Island

star-5
42
12 Tours and Activities

A sandy peninsula extending into Honolulu Harbor, Magic Island—more rarely referred by its official name Aina Moana—affords rare right-off-the-beach green space in downtown Honolulu thanks to a failed 1964 development project. Today, families gather on weekends to barbeque alongside its picnic tables and splash in its rock-wall protected lagoon, while friends toss footballs and Frisbees not far from the state’s largest shopping mall. The centrally-located park about halfway between downtown Honolulu and Waikiki has three restroom and changing room blocks located at various points along its 30 acres. It is adjacent to the larger Ala Moana beach park which has a performance pavilion. The area is popular with joggers and dog walkers and regularly hosts community events including an annual family carnival.

Learn More
Ala Moana Beach Park

Ala Moana Beach Park

14 Tours and Activities

Ala Moana Beach Park is where locals head to enjoy a weekend in the sun. While it’s moderately crowded during the middle of the week, sunny weekends are like an outdoor block party where everyone is down at the beach. Coolers, pop-up tents, BBQ’s, and beach chairs sprawl across 76 acres, and it’s a festive atmosphere along this white sand stretch of Honolulu coastline.

Even with the park’s popularity, however, visitors can still find their own little corner for relaxing out on the sand. The protected lagoon is ideal for lap swimming or visitors traveling with young children, and the offshore reef is where boogie boarders and surfers race across the waves. There isn’t much to see in the way of snorkeling, but the calm waters are perfect for sunbathing while sprawled on an inflatable raft. Lay out a blanket in the shaded grass area if you need to escape the sun, or work up a sweat on the park’s jogging trails or the popular beachfront tennis courts.

Learn More
Honolulu Chinatown

Honolulu Chinatown

5 Tours and Activities

Honolulu's Chinatown is one of the oldest in the United States.

Home to an eclectic assortment of storefronts, spend some time wandering and you’ll find herbalists, temples, antique shops and lei makers. Folks in Chinatown also know how to eat well. When hunger strikes you’ll have your pick of dishes. Chefs serve everything from Chinese dim sum to Cuban and French Fare. Night owls will be happy to know Chinatown offers a variety of nightlife options from jazz clubs to wine bars and nightclubs.

Learn More
Hulihee Palace

Hulihee Palace

3 Tours and Activities
Learn More
Waioli Mission House

Waioli Mission House

2 Tours and Activities
Learn More
Hualalai Volcano

Hualalai Volcano

3 Tours and Activities

Hualalai is massive, and yet it’s unknown. For all of its size and volcanic grandeur—gradually rising behind the town of Kona and fading into the clouds—this dormant volcano is shrouded in obscurity by its famous, more active neighbors.

At 8,200 feet in height, Hualalai isn’t nearly as high as Mauna Loa, and having last erupted in 1801, it isn’t considered nearly as active as the currently erupting Kilauea. Nevertheless, Hualalai remains an active volcano just miles from populous Kona, and experts feel that this sleeping volcano is on the brink of waking up. It’s believed that Hualalai will erupt again within the next 100 years, potentially adding more black lava rock to Kona’s volcanic landscape. As the volcano sleeps, however, coffee farms continue to dominate its flanks and resorts now dot its shoreline.

Learn More
Anini Beach

Anini Beach

star-5
2
2 Tours and Activities
Learn More
Hana Lava Tube (Ka'eleku Caverns)

Hana Lava Tube (Ka'eleku Caverns)

star-4.5
14
1 Tour and Activity

Also known as the Hana Lava Tube, these subterranean caverns were created when lava once cooled on the surface here but continued to flow underneath the ground above. Now there are hundreds of unique rock formations throughout the half mile long cavern system, including stalagmites and stalactites. The caverns are the largest accessible lava tubes on Maui. It is estimated that the caves were formed nearly 30,000 years ago, and legend would tell us they are the work of Pele, the Hawaiian goddess of fire.

Water drips from the ceilings of the caves, but bats and insects are noticeably absent from the environment. Much of the caverns look as though they’ve been coated in chocolate. It’s an underground landscape that feels almost otherworldly, waiting to be explored. Above ground, there is a unique red Ti botanical garden maze that is also easy to get lost in.

Learn More
Kaau Crater

Kaau Crater

1 Tour and Activity
Learn More