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Wuyou Temple
Wuyou Temple

Wuyou Temple

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Chengdu, China

The Basics

Most visitors miss this temple entirely during their day trips to the Leshan Giant Buddha, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Luckily for everyone else, that means it’s a serene place to escape the crowds while enjoying some Chinese temple architecture. Within, visitors will find what amounts to a small Buddhism museum, filled with religious artifacts and Chinese calligraphic paintings. Guided day trips to the world’s largest Buddha statue often include a visit to both Wuyou Temple and nearby Lingyun Temple. Take an overnight trip and you’ll have time to ride a cable car to the top of scenic Mount Emei as well.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Wuyou Temple is an excellent option for spiritual travelers and those looking to get off the beaten path.

  • Wear comfortable shoes and be ready to climb several hundred stairs to reach the temple.

  • Remember to dress respectfully, as this is an active place of worship.

  • Hungry travelers can stop for a meal at the temple’s vegetarian restaurant.

  • Entry to the temple is included with a ticket to see the Leshan Giant Buddha.

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How to Get There

Several buses make the journey from Chengdu to Leshan City each day. From there, you can hire a taxi to the scenic area. Wuyou Temple is about a 30-minute walk from the Leshan Giant Buddha.

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When to Get There

This temple is rarely crowded, as many visitors simply go to see the Giant Buddha and then leave, so the main consideration when deciding when to visit is weather. Spring and fall offer mild temperatures with less chance of rain.

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Lingyun Temple

Wuyou isn’t the only Buddhist temple in the Leshan Giant Buddha scenic area. Your entrance ticket also gets you into Lingyun Temple, situated at the head of the Giant Buddha himself. According to legend, it was a monk from this temple who decided to carve the stone Buddha as a form of protection from the dangerous river currents.

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