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Beomeosa Temple
Beomeosa Temple

Beomeosa Temple

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49 Reviews
Free admission
546 Cheongnyong-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan, South Korea

The Basics

Many visitors to the temple come to wander the complex and enjoy the surrounding verdant grounds and trails for a few hours. Beomeosa Temple is one of several in Korea that allows temple stays, where visitors both foreign and Korean can experience Korean Buddhist monastic life, either for a day or with an overnight stay. The program usually includes meditation sessions, tea ceremonies, traditional monastic meals, and hands-on cultural clinics.

As one of Busan’s most notable landmarks, Beomeosa Temple features on most sightseeing tours of the city, along with other popular attractions such as Gamcheon Culture Village, Jagalchi Fish Market, Busan Tower, and Gukje Market.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Beomeosa Temple is a must-visit for first-time visitors and spiritual travelers.

  • Wear sturdy shoes, especially if you want to explore the hiking trails that surround the temple.

  • This is an active place of worship, so remember to dress respectfully.

  • Public restrooms are available at the temple.

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How to Get There

The temple is well-connected by public transportation. Take the Busan Subway Line 1 to Beomeosa Station and leave through exit 5 or 7. From there, you can either catch a taxi to the temple entrance or take Bus 90 to the Beomeosa Ticket Office bus stop. Alternatively, choose a guided sightseeing tour with provided transportation.

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Trip ideas


When to Get There

The temple is open throughout the year, but if you can, plan your visit during the month of May, when the wisteria surrounding the grounds are usually in full bloom. To escape the crowds, avoid visiting on weekends and holidays, when many locals head to the temple as a starting point for hikes on Geumjeongsan mountain.

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Beomeosa and Seon Buddhism

The monks at Beomeosa Temple practice a form of Buddhism called Seon, better known as Zen in Japanese. The word “Seon” can be translated as “meditation,” and the monks here are known for practicing Sunmudo, a martial arts technique originally taught as a form of dynamic meditation and later used to fight back invaders.

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