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Casa Rosada
Casa Rosada

Casa Rosada

Free admission
Balcarce 50, 1064 Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The Basics

A photo stop at Casa Rosada should be on every traveler’s to-do list, and the famous landmark is included on many Buenos Aires sightseeing tours. Visit as part of a guided city tour, explore the many monuments around Plaza de Mayo on a walking tour, or stop by on a bike tour of Buenos Aires’ southern neighborhoods.

Most visitors are happy to snap photos from the outside, but the Casa Rosada also houses a museum on the history of Argentina. Guided tours are also popular, offering a chance to peek into some of the government chambers and stand on Evita’s famous balcony with a view over the bustling Plaza de Mayo below.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Tours of the Casa Rosada are free but must be booked in advance. English-language tours are held on weekends only.

  • The museum is open from Wednesday to Sunday and is free

  • The Casa Rosada and the surrounding Plaza de Mayo are wheelchair accessible.

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How to Get There

Casa Rosada stands at the eastern end of Plaza de Mayo in downtown Buenos Aires. The closest metro station is Plaza de Mayo (Line A), while numerous buses stop near the square.

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When to Get There

Arrive in the early morning for the best chance of a crowd-free view, or pass by at night when the Casa is dramatically illuminated. The Casa Rosada is closed for tours and museum visits Mondays and Tuesday.

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Casa Rosada History and Legends

Designated a National Historic Monument of Argentina, the pink palace is perhaps most legendary for its lower balcony, where Evita (Eva Perón) rallied working-class crowds in 1949. Legends also abound regarding how the Renaissance-style palace—which was initially to be painted white—got its startling pink color. You might hear about ox blood being mixed into the paint, or the then-President blending the red and white colors of opposing political factions.

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