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Things to Do in British Columbia

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Brackendale Eagles Provincial Park
2 Tours and Activities

Squamish is called the eagle capital of the world and it is here, at the Brackendale Eagle Reserve or Brackendale Eagles Provincial Park, where the largest congregation of wintering bald eagles in North America can be found. Accordingly, the best time to visit the reserve is from late November to late January. During those winter months the eagles get attracted to the area due to the spawning salmons in the river and gather in huge numbers to feast on the fish carcasses. In fact, the Brackendale Eagle Reserve holds a world record from 1994, when 3,769 bald eagles were counted in a single day – that’s more eagles than there are residents of Brackendale.

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Callaghan Valley
2 Tours and Activities

Full of ancient forest and surrounded by Pacific Coastal mountains 56 miles (90 km) north of Vancouver, Callaghan Valley is real BC backcountry. In summer, the valley is home to backpackers and hikers looking for a wilderness experience, while in winter, cross-country skiing and snowshoeing is popular, with over 45 miles (70 km) of cross-country trails and six miles (10 km) of snowshoe trails to explore.

Home to the 2010 Winter Olympics’ Nordic events, the wall of mountains that surrounds the valley creates a unique climate that sees some of the deepest snowfall in the whole of Canada. The ski season is often 150 days long, running right into mid-April.

In spring and summer, Callaghan Valley is all wildflower meadows and wetlands, where you can go lakeside camping, canoeing, boating, fishing and hiking. The 6,590-acre (2,667-hectare) park is also prime wildlife-spotting territory. Look out for bobcats and squirrels, black-tailed deer and moose, black and grizzly bea

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Salt Spring Island
1 Tour and Activity

Salt Spring Island is the biggest, most populated of the Gulf Islands. Blessed with the best climate in Canada – or so they say – and only half the rainfall of Vancouver, Salt Spring Island is a charming destination regardless of the season. The island is well known as a retreat for artists and many painters, photographers, musicians and writers have come here to find a serene workplace in the midst of a peaceful island setting. Thus, a number of galleries, studios and even simple roadside exhibits have sprouted up everywhere and the island is a dream for artists and art lovers alike. The island has an idyllic landscape and rustic character and apart from visiting one of the many art exhibits, popular activities include camping, kayaking, fishing, horseback riding, bird watching and other outdoor activities. Salt Spring Island offers both Ruckle Provincial Park and Mt. Maxwell Provincial Park.

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Cleveland Dam
2 Tours and Activities

Built in 1954, the Cleveland Dam was constructed for a number of important reasons. Unlike many other dams though, this one is not used for hydroelectricity. Instead, the original purpose of the dam was to hold back water entering into Burrard Inlet, which used to come in at a heavy pace carrying with it a hearty amount of silt and rocks, as well as a heavy current. Cleveland Dam was also constructed to protect a means of fresh drinking water for the lower mainland of Vancouver. In fact, the lake above Cleveland Dam provides the lower mainland with a whopping 40% of its fresh drinking water. These days, Cleveland Dam makes up a part of North Vancouver that has quickly become a popular tourism destination and in the area around the dam, there are a number of parks and hiking paths. The dam itself sits in a protected park called Capilano River Regional Park, which also encompasses Capilano Lake, the body of water that the 300-foot spillway of the dam encloses.

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More Things to Do in British Columbia

Harrison River

Harrison River

1 Tour and Activity

Draining the beautifully clear waters of Harrison Lake, Harrison River is a short, but extremely important tributary to the Fraser River system in southern British Columbia, Canada. The river empties into the Fraser approximately a 90-minute drive from the city of Vancouver at the village of Harrison Mills. And although the river officially begins at Harrison Lake, the system is actually the continuation of the Lillooet River system which originates to the north.

Harrison River has suited many needs throughout history. In the 1860s, during the Fraser Gold Rush, the river served as a thoroughfare to the gold-rich area of Lillooet. Today, tourists flock to the area for a number of reasons and from a recreational standpoint, there is plenty to do along the river. For one, Harrison River is a hot spot for wild Salmon fishing.

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