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Bény-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery
Bény-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery

Bény-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery

Free admission
route de Reviers, Reviers, France, 14470

The Basics

This historic cemetery is one of a handful of Canadian Second World War sites in Normandy, where more than 14,000 Canadian soldiers arrived for D-Day alone. It’s an included stop on some tours of D-Day sites in the area, which range from half-day trips to full-day excursions. On these tours, the Bény-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery is frequently combined with other Canadian-specific sites, which include Ardenne Abbey, Juno Beach, and Canada House.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • If you’re visiting Normandy war sites at a busy time, this is a great place to avoid crowds, as the cemetery tends to be quiet.
  • This isn’t the only Canadian war cemetery in Normandy; the other is located at Bretteville-Sur-Laize, roughly 30 minutes away by car.
  • Most of the memorials are open-air, so plan to bring an umbrella if rain is in the forecast.
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How to Get There

The Bény-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery is located on D35, .6 miles (1 kilometer) east of Reviers, Normandy. Most visitors come as part of a tour or with their own vehicle, as public transit is limited. To reach the cemetery from Bayeux, a 14.3-mile (23-kilometer) trip, follow D613 southeast from the city, then turn north onto D35 through Creully, Amblie, and Reviers. From Caen, it’s 11.2 miles (18 kilometers): Follow D7 to D404 and D35.

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Trip ideas


When to Get There

Normandy is a popular destination in the sunny months between June and August, when warm weather brings crowds to beautiful beaches. But while the D-Day sites in Normandy can be visited year round, it’s a moving experience to travel here in early June, when D-Day memorial celebrations are held at the cemetery and across the region.

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Wildcard

What to do Near Bény-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery Though the cemetery is in a less-visited part of Normandy, there’s plenty to explore within half an hour. On the Caen Canal is the Pegasus Memorial, which marks the first objective of airborne troops arriving on D-Day. In Caen itself, find the atmospheric ruins of Caen Castle, plus the Musee des Beaux-Arts de Caen, whose holdings go from 16th-century paintings to sculpture. The city is also home to Ardenne Abbey, another important Canadian Second World War landmark and the site of a wartime tragedy.

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