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Wheels Through Time Museum
Wheels Through Time Museum

Wheels Through Time Museum

62 Vintage Ln, Maggie Valley, North Carolina, NC 28751

The Basics

As well as motor enthusiasts, Wheels Through Time Museum attracts tourists looking for a unique stop on the way to the Great Smoky Mountains. Inside the 38,000-square-foot (3,530-square-meter) facility, you can find displays ranging from early 20th-century bikes to a replica 1940s Harley Davidson dealership. Plus, there’s a gallery of one-of-a-kind cars and American-invented machines that spans snowmobiles to airplanes.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • The museum is a must-see for vintage car and motorcycle enthusiasts.

  • You can take unobtrusive, non-flash photos in the exhibits, but tripods and selfie sticks are prohibited.

  • The museum is wheelchair accessible and kids age 5 and under can visit for free.

  • Memorabilia, souvenirs, and T-shirts can be purchased in the gift shop.

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How to Get There

The Wheels Through Time Museum is located in Maggie Valley, midway between Asheville and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. If traveling from Asheville, take exit 103 off Highway 74 and follow Highway 19 to Maggie Valley, where you’ll turn right on the aptly named Vintage Lane.

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Trip ideas


When to Get There

Like many businesses along the Blue Ridge Parkway, the Wheels Through Time Museum is closed in the winter but reopens around the first week of April. During the high season, it’s open Thursday through Monday from 9am–5pm, and closed on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. To see how the museum got the nickname The Museum That Runs, visit between 12pm and 2pm, when an array of vintage machines are started up.

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Wheels Through Time on TV

The Wheels Through Time Museum founder Dale Walksler spent a year on the History Channel’sAmerican Restoration TV show, showcasing the history, talents, and vintage machines that the museum has collected. While the show is no longer on the air, the team has continued to produce an ongoing series which is now hosted online on Dale’s Channel and can be found on the museum’s website.

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