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La Cité du Vin
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Bordeaux has long been one of the world’s top wine destinations but when Cité du Vin opened in 2016, it finally got a museum to match its reputation. Housed in a modernist building that resembles a wine decanter, the center comprises exhibition spaces, cultural events, a wine bar, a cinema space, and more.

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Saint-Emilion
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Surrounded by the vineyards of Bordeaux, the medieval village of Saint-Emilion is pure eye candy. The picturesque town, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, takes its name from a Benedictine monk who—according to local legend—took refuge in a cave here in the eighth century. Centered around a monolithic church that was painstakingly carved from limestone in the 12th century, the village comprises a cluster of cobbled streets lined with historic stone houses, Romanesque ruins, and shops selling Saint-Emilion wines.

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Château Margaux
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Found in the sandy flatlands of the Médoc region in southwest France, Château Margaux is today known for producing some of the finest – and most expensive – Premier Grand Cru Classé Bordeaux wines in the world. Unusually for Bordeaux, the Margaux estate produces whites as well as rich, spicy world-renowned reds, and sells around 30,000 cases per year. All Margaux wines are produced organically and the average age of the vines is 36 years old, forming from a mixture of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Sauvignon Blanc, Petit Verdot and Cabernet Franc grapes.

Although wines have been produced on the estate since the 1580s, it was confiscated from its aristocratic owners in the French Revolution of 1789–99 and its fortunes were only revived with the advent of the Marquis de la Colonilla in 1810. He built the elegant Palladian mansion, to a design by Louis Combes, which still stands at the heart of the estate; since 1977 it has been the home of the Mentzelopoulos family, who are credited with restoring the reputation of Margaux wines and consistently improving their quality. In 2010 an upgrade of the cellars was undertaken by British mega-architect Lord Norman Foster; a new cooperage, visitor center and tasting rooms were added at the same time.

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Pyla Dune (Dune du Pilat)
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Standing more than 360 feet (110 meters) above sea level in Bordeaux, France, Pyla Dune (Dune du Pilat) is the tallest sand dune in Europe. In the summer months, a staircase is constructed to allow visitors to climb the dune—an activity that draws over one million visitors every year.

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Porte Cailhau
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Built in 1495, this dramatic Gothic Revival 35-meters tall city gate was built to commemorate King Charles VIII's victory at Fornovo in Italy during the Italian War of 1494. At the time, it was the main entry point to Bordeaux from the port. It faces Place du Palais and features several ornamental sculptures and towers, something that is very typical of architecture built under the reign of Charles VIII; indeed, the monarch wanted this gate to showcase his power and affluence. The gate, which was once part of the Bordeaux city wall, was later on used as a defensive tower (the multitude of portcullis, murder holes, and machicolation features are there to prove this), and as a salt scale and storehouse.

Nowadays, it houses an informative exhibition dedicated to the tools and materials with which the tower was built as well as the urban development of Bordeaux. There is a wonderful view of the old town center, the Garonne River, and the Pont de Pierre Bridge from the top floor.

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Place de la Bourse (Place Royale)
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The Place de la Bourse (or Place Royale) faces onto the river Garonne. It was laid out in the 1700s by Louis XV's architect, Gabriel, to act as a dramatic frame for an equestrian statue of the monarch.

The Place de la Bourse is framed on one side by the Stock Exchange (the 'Bourse' that gives the square its name) and on the other side by a museum. In the center of the square is its chief beauty and attraction, the fountain of the Three Graces, built by Visconti in 1869. When it's lit at night it is highly photogenic.

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Médoc

Stretching north and west of Bordeaux along the Garonne River, the Médoc region produces some of the area’s best wines. Renowned for its idyllic vineyards, historic chateaux, and cabernet sauvignon wines, Médoc should be at the top of the list for wine lovers visiting Bordeaux.

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Grand Theatre
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Overview

Built in the 18th century, Bordeaux’s Grand Theatre is a well-known symbol of French culture. The ornate neoclassical building is used for theatrical and operatic performances and has also served as the location of the French parliament during times of war.

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Bordeaux Cathedral (Cathédrale St. André)
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The most remarkable religious building in Bordeaux, according to locals, the Bordeaux Cathedral (Cathédrale St. André) is famous for having a separate and independent bell tower. The cathedral was first built in the 13th century and is now a UNESCO World Heritage site, while having once played a significant role in the religious and cultural development of Bordeaux; it is indeed where the prosperous Eleanor of Aquitaine got married to the future King of France, Louis VII. Her considerable wealth benefited the entire city and even the cathedral itself, which was subsequently enlarged and lavishly decorated. One of its most remarkable features is undoubtedly the wrought ironwork by local craftsman Blaise Charlut, which is located in the middle of the transept. The cathedral’s 14th-century tympanum depicts the Last Judgment in the most dramatic way in prominent Gothic architecture.

Bordeaux Cathedral is also where Archbishop Bertrand de Goth found out that he had been elected Pope and officially became Pope Clement V, the first to move the Curia from Rome to Avignon. Its also infamous for suppressing the order of the Knights Templar. The cathedral would again see the wedding of a royal family in 1615, this time between King Louis XIII and Queen consort Anne of Austria, following a tradition of fortifying military and political alliances between the Catholic powers of France and Spain with royal marriages.

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Pomerol

Pomerol is an undersized, wine-oriented village located about 45 minutes east of Bordeaux. But its relatively small size–just 2,000 acres–definitely isn’t an obstacle to quality; indeed, Pomerol has become one of the region’s most respected Appellations d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) over the second half of the 20th century, despite being slightly different from the strictly categorized, upmarket Bordeaux wines.

With a yearly production that edges about 3,000 bottles per winery, Pomerol wines find prestige in rarity. Most of them are produced on small farmlands and insist on remaining a high quality, low volume type of wine, a feature that is unquestionably reflected in their steep prices.

With most wines in Pomerol being of the Merlot kind, the region is therefore a brilliant destination for wine neophytes with a large budget, as Merlot is one of the most palatable red wines present in France. Cabernet Franc also plays a supporting role, a wine that will appeal to those in search of crisp, savory flavors.

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More Things to Do in Aquitaine

Garonne River

Garonne River

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Flowing down from the Spanish Pyrenees all the way to France’s Atlantic coast, the Garonne is the most important river of southwestern France. Passing through two major cities—Toulouse and Bordeaux—the Garonne also runs into the Gironde estuary, the largest of its kind in Europe.

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Château Mouton Rothschild

Château Mouton Rothschild

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Often regarded as one of the world’s greatest and most expensive Bordeaux wines, Château Mouton Rothschild requires very little presentation. The Rothschild family was famous throughout Europe for its financial dealings and interest in philanthropy and wines. The estate was acquired in the early 1800s and soon started to make wine, but it remained largely underrated as Bordeaux wasn’t considered a wine region back then. It wasn’t until the 1920s that Château Mouton Rothschild gained notoriety, thanks to the committed and relentless work of Baron Philippe de Rothschild, whose decisions would not only forever change the Rothschild estate but also the wine industry itself.

The Rothschild estate comprises many attractions, including the vineyards, the 100-meter long Great Barrel Hall, the classical Château, a 120,000-bottle underground cellar, and a Museum of Wine in Art (with an exclusive collection of wine paraphernalia and works of art dating back from the 17th century).

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Grosse Cloche

Grosse Cloche

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One of Bordeaux’s most popular attractions is, predictably, also one of the most historically significant: Grosse Cloche. So much so, in fact, that the edifice is heavily featured in the city’s coat of arms. What once was the old Town Hall’s belfry dates back to the medieval times and was built as part of the city’s thick fortifications. It actually consists of two 40-meter-high towers connected by a central structure toward the top, which contains the famous bell and features an 18th-century solar dial. The tower is often referred to as the “golden lion,” a clear reference to the weather vane atop the central dome that represents the English Kingdom back when the Duchess Eleanor of Aquitaine married King Henry II of England. Grosse Cloche–literally, the big bell, as it weighs well over 16,500 pounds (7,500 kilos)–was up until quite recently used by city magistrates to announce the start of harvest season, or alternatively, to warn residents of a fire. Rumor has it that locals were so attached to the bell that the king threatened to take it away when a resident misbehaved!

Nowadays, the bell only rings only six times a year, for national holidays and military celebrations.

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Pont de Pierre

Pont de Pierre

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What is perhaps one of the most iconic bridges in all of France is definitely a must-see for visitors to Bordeaux. Connecting the left and right bank of the city since 1819 but ordered by Napoleon I during the First French Empire, Pont de Pierre–the stone bridge– was the first bridge to cross the mighty Garonne River. Indeed, its construction was a challenging one, as the current is extremely strong at this point in the river; more than 4,000 workers were needed to build it, using an English diving bell to stabilize the pillars. Consequently, Pont de Pierre was actually the only bridge to connect the two banks for nearly 150 years!

The red-stone bridge consists of seventeen spans–the exact number of letters in the name Napoléon Bonaparte–lined with elegant iron light posts; each of the bridge’s pillars is capped by a medallion to honor both the emperor and Bordeaux’s coat of arms. A transport route was created in 2004 to convey the over-sized structural sections of the Airbus A380 airliner from the manufacturer to the headquarters in Toulouse; Pont de Pierre had to be slightly modified to allow the passage of barges, and thus became a new quintessential thing to do in Bordeaux in the process.

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Quinconces Square (Place des Quinconces)

Quinconces Square (Place des Quinconces)

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Stretching more than 12 hectares (30 acres) along the banks of the Garonne River, Quinconces Square (Place des Quinconces) is Bordeaux’s largest square. Comprising a vast esplanade flanked by tree-lined walkways and fronted by the grand Monument to the Girondins, it’s among the most important sites of the city’s UNESCO-listed historic center.

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Basilica of St. Michael (Basilique St. Michel)

Basilica of St. Michael (Basilique St. Michel)

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The intricate facade of the Basilica of St. Michael (Basilique St. Michel) in central Bordeaux is one of the city’s most recognizable landmarks. It took more than 200 years to build, from the end of the 14th century to the end of the 16th century. The freestanding belfry, with its ornate decorations, also draws many visitors.

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Girondins Monument (Monument aux Girondins)

Girondins Monument (Monument aux Girondins)

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Located in the very center of Place des Quinconces in Bordeaux, the Girondins Monument (Monument aux Girondins) was elevated in the late 1800s to commemorate the Girondists, a fervent republican political faction consisting of militants originally part of France’s Legislative Assembly, and one of the first group to openly denounce Louis XVI’s reign and the monarchy in general. Their 1793 mass execution, which was caused by their resistance against the rapidly increasing momentum of the revolution, is often considered to be the starting point of the Reign of Terror.

At 54 meters high, the Girondins Monument overlooks one of the city’s busiest squares and is adorned with an intricate bronze statue representing Lady Liberty breaking free of her shackles and gracing Bordeaux with her palm of victory. At the base of the column stands a colossal fountain and two basins, with dramatic bronze sculptures of charging horses, each signifying a different aspect of modern French society. The south-facing side honors the “Triumph of the Republic” and focuses on work, security, power, obligatory education and the victory over ignorance, vice and lies, while the north-facing side is dedicated to peace, fraternity, trade, arts and abundance, ultimately representing the “Triumph of the Concord.”

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Bordeaux Wine and Trade Museum (Musée du Vin et du Négoce de Bordeaux)

Bordeaux Wine and Trade Museum (Musée du Vin et du Négoce de Bordeaux)

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Opened in 2008 in the historic Chatrons district of Bordeaux, the Bordeaux Wine and Trade Museum (Musée du Vin et du Négoce de Bordeaux) is a must for anyone interested in learning more about the history of the wine trade in France from the Middles Ages to the present day.

Located in what was traditionally the wine merchants quarter of the city, the museum presents artifacts, models and two-dimensional realizations designed to explain the Bordeaux wine trade system. It also tells the stories of the great wine merchant families of the 18th and 19th centuries through documents and personal testimonies. The museum also attempts to educate visitors about the various classifications of wine and different ageing processes used in the local cellars. Artifacts, documents and other enactments provide insight about the Port of Bordeaux and its wine exports. Finally, visitors can sample a couple wines and learn from the experts how to differentiate between certain grape varieties.

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Port of the Moon (Port de la Lune)

Port of the Moon (Port de la Lune)

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Bordeaux in southwest France was once a vibrant port city. The port itself was known as the Port of the Moon (Port de la Lune) because it sat on a semi-circular part of the Garonne River. Historically the left bank of the port has been the center of commerce and culture. Throughout the past 2,000 years, the port has played an important role in shaping the city's history and its place as a world city of wine.

When the automobile became more prominent, the historical buildings in this area began to degrade and turn black. The roads were not meant for cars, and traffic jams clogged up the port area. The port's importance declined, and it was eventually moved downstream to the northern suburbs. In the 1990s great efforts were made to clean up the area, including the buildings, and the waterfront is now lined with pedestrian walkways, bicycle paths, shops, and museums. In 2007 the Port of the Moon waterfront was named a UNESCO World Heritage site.

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Port of Bordeaux

Port of Bordeaux

The Port of Bordeaux is a busy river port which offers easy access to the city of Bordeaux and acts as the gateway to Aquitaine. Enjoy views over the city’s 18-century architecture as your ship navigates the Gironde Estuary before docking at the city center Port de la Lune or Le Verdon, a 20-minute drive from Bordeaux proper.

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Hondarribia

Hondarribia

On the banks of the Bidasoa river, sheltered by Mount Rhune’s austere peak, Hondarribia is one of the most picturesque towns on the Basque coast. Close to the French border, just east of San Sebastián, this lovely walled fishing village is enjoying a gastronomical moment, with an explosion of noteworthy restaurants.

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Bordeaux Museum of Fine Arts (Musée des Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux)

Bordeaux Museum of Fine Arts (Musée des Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux)

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The Bordeaux Museum of Fine Arts (Musée des Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux) is in itself quite beautiful, being housed in the 18th century Hôtel de Ville (Palais Rohan) and set in a park. It was instituted by Napoleon's decree in 1801.

The museum's collection ranges from the 15th century to contemporary works, but its specialty is Flemish and Dutch work from the 17th century, with works by Rubens providing the highlight. There is also a strong Italian emphasis, with pieces by Titian, Veronese and Perugia.

Other artists featured are Bonnard, Matisse, Delacroix and Redon.

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Arcachon Bay (Bassin d'Arcachon)

Arcachon Bay (Bassin d'Arcachon)

With 47 miles (76 kilometers) of seafront and lakeside beaches, idyllic resort towns fringed with pine forests and marshlands, and Europe’s tallest sand dune, Arcachon Bay (Bassin d'Arcachon) is the retreat of choice for nature lovers heading to France’s Atlantic Coast.

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Camino de Santiago

Camino de Santiago

The pilgrimage route called Camino di Santiago (sometimes translated as Way of St. James) stretches across Europe into northern Spain and down to Santiago di Compostela. This sacred path has been followed since medieval times by faithful Christians who seek to worship at the tomb of St. James, as well as other hikers who are inspired by the spiritual “way.”

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