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Things to Do in Alicante

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Santa Barbara Castle (Castillo de Santa Bárbara)
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21 Tours and Activities

Travelers seeking a touchstone to history will find ancient artifacts dating back to the Bronze Age, as well as items from the Iberian and Roman empires at the Castle of Santa Barbara. This towering structure is tucked atop a rocky overlook and dates back to the 9th century. Like much of the region, it was once ruled by Muslims before being captured by Castillians in the mid-1200s. The castle grounds, which stand high above Alicante, are worth exploring, and visitors say the epic views contribute to a greater understanding of the city’s layout. A tiny souvenir shop and quaint coffee shop serving up strong brews offer the perfect place to relax after wandering through the historic site, which does not disappoint.

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Explanada de España
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Running along the seafront from Alicante Port in the east to Canalejas Park in the west, the magnificent Explanada de España offers a scenic introduction to Alicante, looking out over the yachts and fishing boats of the marina.

Laid out in the early 20th-century by architect José Guardiola Picó and restored in the 1990s, the grand promenade is among the most famous in Spain and runs for over 500 meters. The wide walkway is adorned with some 6.5 million marble tiles, creating a dramatic wave-like mosaic of red, white and blue, hemmed in by rows of towering palm trees and elegant streetlamps. As well as being home to city landmarks like the Casa Carbonell, the Royal Casino de Alicante and the Hotel Gran Sol, the Explanada is lined with lively cafés, bars and restaurants, and hosts an eclectic mix of artists, street entertainers and crafts stalls during the summer season.

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Alicante Town Hall (Ayuntamiento de Alicante)
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18 Tours and Activities

Visitors will likely hear the iconic bells of Alicante Town Hall chime every 15 minutes while wandering throughout the town. This famous baroque-style building holds court in the center of one of the city’s many squares is a destination all its own, thanks to ornate architecture and displays of ancient ruins.

A replica of a well-known Dali sculpture greets travelers as they enter the first floor of Town Hall and several rooms on the second floor showcase historical exhibits about the building and city history. Dozens of cafes are within easy walking distance of the square and make for a perfect place to grab coffee, a drink or a scoop of ice cream and settle into the local scene to watch as people wander by.

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Casa Carbonell
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Built in the 1920s under the orders of wealthy textile manufacturers, the striking white façade and towering blue domes of Casa Carbonell has become an iconic landmark in the Alicante skyline.

According to an old legend, Enrique Carbonell, a well-to-do businessman, arrived at a swanky local hotel after WWI and was turned away because of his shoddy dress. In an act of revenge he vowed to build an even better structure—what is now Casa Carbonell—right next door. While most locals deny the validity of this tale today, the impressive iron, glass and marble work of this classic building is irrefutable. Travelers will love to wander the grounds and capture images of Casa Carbonell against the striking backdrop of modern Alicante.

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Port of Alicante
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As one of Spain’s most popular Mediterranean resorts and the gateway to the famous Costa Blanca, Alicante has long been an important cruise destination, with an average 88,000 cruise passengers passing through its port each year.

Built around a natural harbor, Alicante Port is ideally situated for visitors, linked to the city by the scenic Esplanada de Espana and just minutes’ walk from top attractions like the Castillo de Santa Barbara, the Santa Maria Basilica and El Postiguet Beach.

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Atalaya Castle
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This iconic castle known as the Watchtower in English has a long history of strength and resistance, since Muslim residents held off three different sieges by James I or Aragon. It wasn’t until 1240 that defeat was admitted and the picture-perfect castle was taken by the Kingdom of Castile.

Today, travelers can visit this historic site and wander the interior courtyard framed by sky-high walls and wander the second floor where a reproduction of a khamsa—a well-known Muslim and North African image of an open hand—is on display.

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Alcoy (Alcoi)
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Some 66,000 people call the rocky hillsides of the municipality known as Alcoy home. Its deep historic roots which date back more than 60,000 years draw travelers in search of connecting to an earlier time. Ancient rock paintings near la Sarga and Iberian settlement ruins are part of what makes Alcoy a unique destination.

In addition to shadowy caves and plains dotted with Greco-Roman pottery fragments, the city is home to a number of significant architectural structures. The Barchell Castle, hermitage of St. Anthony the Abbot, the Archeological Museum and the convent of Sant Agusti are all popular stops on a tour of the past in scenic Alcoy.

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Elche
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Some 300,000 protected date palms rustle above ancient Elche (Elx), the legacy of 6th-century Phoenician gardeners, though the city is older still. They line the banks of the Vinalopó River, along with Elche's most magnificent buildings.

This is an exotic spot of archaeological treasures, fine museums, Moorish domes, and beautiful churches. Meaningful places, such as the soft-lit stone arches of the Arab Baths (which probably date to Roman times), artistic gardens of the Huerto del Cura, and evocative ruins of La Alcudia are the attractions, rather different from those of the rest of the coast.

Still, just 15 minutes from the city proper, pale beaches await sun lovers, and there are certainly fine dining and nightlife options aplenty. This is also, by the way, the self-proclaimed "Footwear Capital of the World," or at least Spain, producing half of the nation's shoes.

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